Letters: Memorials may be dangerous

Roadside memorials may cause drivers to bedistracted

Over the ages, man has found many ways to deal with the death of loved ones. From the ancient ceremonies, mummifications, through to our present methods of cremation or burial in graveyards.  Very new in the time scheme of things, is a roadside memorial.

If I happen to meet my end by the side of the road, I do not want a roadside memorial.I do not want to put any one in grave danger (pardon the pun).

At first, people are stopping by, slowing down, and standing around providing an extreme hazard to everyone, at an inherently bad spot on the road.

Next, after the crowds have left, it provides an ongoing distraction to everyone else driving by.  People have a nasty habit of driving toward things they focus on.

Finally, the dead flowers, etc., become an eyesore.  I don’t believe the burden of cleaning it up should be placed on others, who also have to make a decision as to “when” it is appropriate and then put their lives in danger to clean it up.

Personally, if I met my end at that spot, from my own stupidity of reckless driving, I really don’t want to be remembered for it. If it was caused by someone else, I forgive them, they shouldn’t have the reminder.

There is a really good alternative, it’s called a grave yard, they are great places for memorials, and generally they are a place designed for the purpose, a place of quiet solitude, a place for reflection. A place without a semi-tractor trailer with a load of logs, bearing down on my family and friends; a small skid away from killing them all.

I would like to think many others might feel this way, but out of a sense of propriety, fail to voice their opinion.  And before the rest of you get your panties in a knot, all I ask is that you think about it, and remember this is just my opinion.

R. Drennan

Sooke

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