Letters: No pipeline

Letter writer questions safety and environmental impact of pipeline

Open letter to Christy Clark:

I would like to thank you for all the CO2 in the air and the ability to create more by selling oil, coal and gas to China.

The scientists are telling us to stop now. They say the CO2 is creating all the drought and storms in the world. The oceans are becoming acidic and can’t take in more CO2. The shellfish are dying, the krill that the whales are feeding on is dying. Don’t forget that these resources are not renewable.

However, why don’t we have more refineries here in B.C.? So we might have cheaper gas, instead of giving it away. This poor old Earth can’t take it anymore.

Don’t we deserve to be able to use our own resources here? The scientists say the oil will only last for 25 years if we ship it at the rate it is going.

When I lived in Smithers, I was on a panel that lasted four days. Lots of people took turns over the four days and only one was in favour of the pipe line. But Enbridge said 75 per cent of the people were for it in the paper. The gas pipeline is also capable of carrying oil as well. What would it be like if the tankers went around in the Kitimat channel? It would be gone forever, jobs, environment, food sources, wild life, salmon gone.

I  was a rancher and hunter in Smithers, for 35 years, and don’t want to see it gone. I was in Valdez, Alaska three years ago and the oil is still there under the rocks on the beaches after 25 years, like a thick tar. When the pipelines are built it will create jobs, but when it is completed only a few will be needed to maintain it. Just think if one of these pipes break, the spill would go into the lakes and rivers. I have seen slides that have wiped out the gas line that is there now. Doesn’t this tell you something is wrong? The oil companies can’t guarantee it won’t happen. Can you tell me why the government is not listening?

After all the oil and gas is gone there won’t be anything left but big holes in the ground. We don’t want any fracking of gas wells. It kills the water aquifer. They use large amounts of chemicals to do this, which they can’t retrieve. I have seen people light the gas coming from the kitchen tops and even light the gas in creeks. These are not my submissions, but scientists who say “stop.”

Gordon Stewart

Sooke

 

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