Letters to the Editor – April 13

Minimum wage, CRD appointments, SEAPARC land purchase

A skewed sense of entitlement

Now that B.C. leads Canada with the lowest minimum wage, partly as a result of freezing it for eight years, there is a call to raise it.

One third of those using food banks are children and youth and the term, “working poor” has settled uncomfortably into our dialogue on the economy.

Once again, there is a great hue and cry from business and the high priests of profit against paying people a living wage. It’s a job killer say Stephen Harper, Christy Clark and the business financed conservative governments.

Yet last year when Harper was throwing money at children and families in a failed bid to get re-elected, economists said that money gave a boost to the summer economy.

The simple fact is money in more pockets strengthens the economy and helps everyone.

Our governments have become the political arm of corporate power even though we as taxpayers pay them very well.

The old lie about fair wages and a government that helps people being bad for the economy needs to be outed. The “sky is falling” squawks from the corporate and political right are self-serving and underline their skewed sense of entitlement.

Ted Roberts, Sooke

 

Mayor Tait remains municipal director

Re: Police called after altercation at council (News, April 6)

Good thing we don’t have knights duelling for their ladies or Coun. Rick Kasper might have been in more trouble than he was on March 23 confronted by Mayor Maja Tait’s husband.

The Sooke News Mirror reported Mr. Tait infuriated that Sooke council expected Mr. Kasper to continue acting as a director on the CRD Board after Mayor Tait resumed her office.

Mr. Kasper says Sooke council didn’t have to recognize that she also returned as the municipal director.

What I read in the Local Government Act (Sec. 198 and 200) is that Mr. Kasper and whoever else thought that one up got it wrong. Are they using an Ouija board or some other occult method to make decisions?

The act says any member of council can be appointed as municipal director. The appointment is expected to be until the next municipal election. The present term is four years. The alternate director is also appointed for a four year term.

When the person appointed as a director is not available, the alternate director takes that person’s place on the regional board.

If the director resigns, is disqualified or dies, the alternate director is then appointed as director and a new alternate is appointed to finish the term.

The alternate does not replace the director at the whim of the council any more than council members can decide midterm to kick someone out of his elected office and hold a byelection without a reason recognized in the acts.

Heather Phillips, Sooke

 

No tax increase for land purchase

Re: SEAPARC land comes under public scrutiny (News, April 6)

We always look forward to your coverage of our upcoming referendum, but I would appreciate correcting a small but important fact in your April 6 article.

The cost of financing the purchase of the 23-acre golf course will be $61,000 per year or $ 4.80 per year for Juan de Fuca homeowners with a home assessed at $400,000 or $8.41 per year for a Sooke homeowner with a home valued at $400,000.

SEAPARC will make these payments from their existing requisition and will not be raising taxes.

Once again, there will be no tax increase to the residents of Sooke or Juan de Fuca to fund the acquisition of the former DeMamiel golf course.

Mike Hicks, director, Juan de Fuca Electoral Area

 

Pot store offers health options

Re: Marijuana dispensary will only sell to people who have medical need (News, April 6)

Sooke’s only four-way street light gives us more time to ponder the impact of the new business in town.

Reactions to Sooke’s Medijuana storefront location will run the spectrum, from the focus on new risks to local children to the assumed downgrade of our community reputation.

The newsflash is that kids will get their hands on pot if they want it. Seems some adults have amnesia about their own youth and easy access to alcohol or drugs if they wanted it then.

The high visibility location is a plus as it legitimizes its role as a health treatment business as does the drug store across the street.

If one can view Medijuana without emotion and research who its customers are, the surprise would be that its most frequent business is for middle aged women with chronic pain issues.

Laws are changing, allowing people to determine what gives them the best quality of life.

Carmen Neumann, Sooke

 

 

 

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