Letters to the editor – Nov. 11

Weekly letters to the editor from within the Sooke community.

Some drivers ‘clueless’ in Sooke roundabout

The new roundabout is intended to be a vast improvement to the traffic flow at the Evergreen Centre junction. It’ll be that, if drivers learn how to use a roundabout.

When the work crews are off duty, the construction progress thus far has us now using the roundabout as a “finished” roundabout.

The signs are clearly posted: “Yield to traffic in the roundabout.” This isn’t happening.

There are drivers on Sooke Road coming from the west and heading east, and vice versa, to wherever they’re going, that somehow figure they still have the right of way because they’re on Sooke Road, and the roundabout just means they have to dip slightly to the right, and then carry on.

They seem to think that anyone already in the roundabout has to wait for them to go through. Wrong. I’ve nearly lost my front fenders to these types of drivers five times now, and the project isn’t even completed yet. I’m sure I’m not the only one with the same experience recently.

I hope Sooke RCMP send a member to sit somewhere near the new Royal Bank building to monitor this crap, and hands out expensive tickets to the clueless drivers who don’t grasp what a roundabout is for.

If what I’ve seen so far isn’t fixed, ICBC isn’t going to like the claims tally stemming from this new roundabout.

Garnet Saunders, Sooke

 

Motorists must yield to emergency vehicles

Re: Ambulance response times getting slower (News, Nov. 4)

I have been a paramedic for 30 years. A disturbing and frustrating pattern of driver behavior has become so commonplace as to be the norm, rather than the exception: I refer to the almost universal failure of motorists to exercise their legal obligations to yield to emergency vehicles that are displaying flashing red lights.

The law requires that motorists pull over parallel to the closest edge of the road and stop until an emergency vehicle has passed. It does not state that one merely changes lanes, or that one stops suddenly in the middle of the road or blocks an intersection, your obligation is to yield to the emergency vehicle – not the other way around.

With the propensity for cities to use medians at intersections, it is becoming increasingly more difficult and dangerous for emergency vehicle operators to respond. As with divided highways or one way streets, the closest edge of the road may be on the left, not the right.  if traffic would pull over to their closest road edge, even the largest fire trucks can pass.

Barely one driver in 20 fulfills their legal obligations to properly yield.

Each and every motorist out there has the opportunity to help, or profoundly hinder responses by all emergency services. there is nothing more tragic and frustrating than trying to reach a time sensitive medical emergency but cannot because drivers refuse to yield, block intersections or simply lock up their brakes in the middle of the road.

It is not just “other” drivers that are the problem. I ask you to evaluate your own role in helping emergency responders get to where they are needed.

Ian Hames, Paramedic, Chase, B.C.

 

Fletcher an apologist for the B.C. Liberals

Re: Silence of the email servers has a deafening sound (B.C. Views, Nov. 4)

In his latest opinion piece, Tom Fletcher once again attempts to explain away and apologize for the egregious behavior of the B..C Liberals and Premier Clark.

Many journalists and others have spent months, even years, wondering why their FOI requests have gone unanswered, and B.C. residents are continually left in the dark.

Now it turns out, the government claims to no longer keep records of what it does, a juvenile and patently absurd excuse along the lines of a dog ate my homework.

According to Mr. Fletcher, the bad guys are not the ones hiding and keeping important information from the public, whom the MLAs are elected to serve, but those making the FOI requests and criticizing the lack of oversight and reportage.

In light of the breath of fresh air which is the new federal Liberal government and our new Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Mr. Fletcher’s article so clearly represents the type of government 70 percent of Canadians just elected to remove, the stifling, controlling, fascistic Harper government. This article makes abundantly clear what B.C. residents will hopefully do next: vote out the BC “Liberals” who are federal Tories with another name, and elect people who will do for B.C. what Trudeau and his government wants to do for the entire country.

Helene Harrison, Shirley

 

Just Posted

Greater father involvement in the home leads to improved childhood development and increased marital satisfaction, says expert. (Black Press Media file photo)
University of Victoria researcher finds lack of father involvement a drag on gender equality

Working women still taking on most child and household duties in Canada

Alex Fiset and Cooper Oakes, both Grade 4, running to the finish, raising money for the ALS Society of B.C. (Zoe Ducklow - Sooke News Mirror)
John Muir students rally for ALS support

‘Hey ALS. Nobody likes you!’ the students yelled

New COVID-19 cases on Vancouver Island by local health area for the week of June 6-12. (B.C. Centre for Disease Control image)
New COVID-19 cases up on Island, but health officials say trends going right way

There were 22 new COVID-19 cases in Greater Victoria last week after just four the week before

Helicopter crew members onboard HMCS Halifax conduct inflight refueling during Operation Reassurance in the Mediterranean Sea in 2020. Some of the military choppers flying around Greater Victoria recently are taking part in a special ops training exercise. (Photo by Cpl. Braden Trudeau/Trinity-Formation Imaging Services)
Special Ops exercise brings influx of helicopters to Victoria

Ontario-based air force unit comes to Victoria to train over ocean

Saanich police took a suspect into custody after a store employee on Cedar Hill Cross Road was assaulted Wednesday afternoon. (Black Press Media file photo)
Employee assaulted at Saanich store after asking suspected shoplifters to leave

June 16 incident saw worker taken to hospital with non-life-threatening injuries

People line up to get their COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination centre, Thursday, June 10, 2021 in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Vaccines, low COVID case counts increase Father’s Day hope, but risk is still there

Expert says people will have to do their own risk calculus before popping in on Papa

FILE – A science class at L.A. Matheson Secondary in Surrey, B.C. on March 12, 2021. (Lauren Collins/Surrey Now Leader)
Teachers’ union wants more COVID transmission data as B.C. prepares for back-to-school

BCTF says that details will be important as province works on plan for September

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry outlines B.C.’s COVID-19 restart plan, May 25, 2021, including larger gatherings and a possible easing of mandatory masks on July 1. (B.C. government photo)
B.C. records 120 new COVID-19 cases, second vaccines accelerating

Lower Pfizer deliveries for early July, Moderna shipments up

A Heffley Creek peacock caught not one - but two - lifts on a logging truck this month. (Photo submitted)
Heffley Creek-area peacock hops logging trucks in search of love

Peacock hitched two lifts in the past month

The Calgary skyline is seen on Friday, Sept. 15, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
2 deaths from COVID-19 Delta variant in Alberta, 1 patient was fully immunized

Kerry Williamson with Alberta Health Services says the patients likely acquired the virus in the hospital

The first suspension bridge is the tallest in Canada, with a second suspension bridge just below it. The two are connected by a trail that’s just over 1 km. (Claire Palmer photo)
PHOTOS: The highest suspension bridges in Canada just opened in B.C.

The Skybridge in Golden allows visitors to take in views standing at 130 and 80 metres

B.C. Premier John Horgan leaves his office for a news conference in the legislature rose garden, June 3, 2020. (B.C. government photo)
B.C. premier roasted for office budget, taxing COVID-19 benefits

Youth addiction law that triggered election hasn’t appeared

BC Ferries’ newest Island Class vessel is experiencing an issue with one of its thrusters off the Algerian coast. Photo courtesy patbaywebcam.com.
BC Ferries newest vessel having mechanical issues in Mediterranean

Island 4 will be repaired in Spain before crossing Atlantic

A vial containing the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine is shown at a vaccination site in Marcq en Baroeul, outside Lille, northern France, Saturday, March 20, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Michel Spingler
mRNA vaccines ‘preferred’ for all Canadians, including as 2nd dose after AstraZeneca: NACI

New recommendations prioritizes Pfizer, Moderna in almost all cases

Most Read