RICKTER SCALE: Ghoulish bride finds fun in Halloween

Obsessive Halloween Disorder puts spouse on alert high for All Hallows Eve

As we roll into October, the bride’s OHD flies into high gear like a witch on a turbo-charged broom.

For those not familiar with the syndrome, OHD stands for Obsessive Halloween Disorder, a quip one of Joan’s co-workers cleverly crafted, much to my perverse delight.

Some of the symptoms of OHD include starting to put up collections of ghosts, skulls, witches and other otherworldly items in September.

And that’s only because I’ve managed to hammer out an agreement that she refrain until August is behind us so we don’t spoil the last barbecues of summer by turning our courtyard into a graveyard.

Another sure sign OHD has taken hold is the need to keep one or two Halloween decorations up throughout the year.

I’ve backed off on that futile fight because it’s almost a relief to see the bulk of the black mass of decorations come down grudgingly around mid-November.

I will admit though, it is easier to find the keyhole after dark with 20 or 30 sets of glowing eyes sunken into skeletons, plastic pumpkins and other lost souls illuminating the yard. Whoever came up with the idea of battery-powered glow in the dark devices certainly had Joan in mind.

She actually gets an additional spring in her step the first time she spots the Halloween displays starting to adorn the windows of the various loonie stores she passionately peruses every year in the hope that something new has come onto the market.

If it was up to my little bride of Frankenstein, the holiday world would be turned on its skeletal ear, with Halloween becoming a month-long festival of fright. To compensate, she would gladly turn Christmas into a one off limited to muted family gatherings.

When we first moved into our comfortable cluster of townhouses 16 years ago, Joan would dress up to hand out treats at the door of our over-decorated domain. I used to love responding to the parents who said “Your kids  must love this!” with “actually, my kid is 22 and he lives in Vancouver.”

Although the lure of Sunriver has caused the 30-odd kids we used to get to dwindle to less than a handful, Halloween is still a full-tilt boogie event in our home. For now, and the foreseeable future, as nauseam.

•••

Rick Stiebel is a Sooke resident and semi-retired journalist.

 

 

Just Posted

EMCS Wolverines off to slow start

Wolverines start season 0-2

Victoria Police investigate stabbing in restaurant on Douglas Street

Police were called to the 800-block around 1:30 p.m.

‘Fix Canada First’ posters found at Victoria bus stops

At least five posters found along Douglas Street

Saanich residents deliver notice to Capital Regional District

Grange Road residents fear the loss of up to 50 trees

Council approves plan banning cycling in Haro Woods

Municipality accused of caving to small minority of park users

Man caught on camera allegedly trying to defraud ICBC

Auto-insurer warns B.C. drivers to record info after crashes

Vancouver Island man named Philadelphia Flyers assistant GM

Courtenay’s Brent Flahr spent nine-plus years in Minnesota

Warning issued as forecast calls for 20-foot waves in Tofino

Dangerous waves, strong currents and upper-shoreline flooding expected for Tofino-Ucluelet area

Oil tanker ban to be reviewed by committee

Indigenous groups for and against Bill C-48 travel to Ottawa to influence the Senate’s decision

An 800-pound pig named Theodore needs a forever home, B.C. society says

‘Theodore is not destined to be somebody’s bacon’

Teenager Alphonso Davies wins Canadian Men’s Soccer Player for the Year Award

Derek Cornelius and Chilliwack native, Jordyn Huitema were named Canadian Youth International Players of the Year

B.C. teen MMA fighter shows heart

Young Unity MMA competitors bring home Ws

2,000 Canadians died of an overdose in first 6 months of the year

New data from the Public Health Agency of Canada shows the crisis is not subsiding

Most Read