Riot control

Letters

No city, including Vancouver, has enough police to control a large riot like the recent one at the last hockey game. The police obviously need help.

There is probably lots of help available from the military. If there is not enough full-time military in the area, then call in the militia (reservists). I was once an enthusiastic reservist for three years immediately after World War II, underaged and an accomplished fibber. We trained twice a week and beer was available in the canteen.

It would not take long to train young reservists, whose goal is to serve Canada part-time, the dynamics of riot control. What’s better is the federal government pays for it all.

They would have to learn:

(a) Club control, to avoid fractured skulls. (Just the right tap, please).

(b) The contemplated use of armoured carriers and the finer points of water cannons, mace, etc.

(c) To assist the police in a disciplined manner in attacking, arresting and containing the bad ones.

Naval units should be present as well because they are extensively trained in damage control and fire suppression.

Our militia has a good history in Canada of being called out immediately after World War I and World War II started. One reservist, Sir Arthur Currie, from Victoria, become our most famous general in World War One (despite suspected embezzlement of funds). My unit was called out in 1948 to assist in the Fraser Valley Flood. (We sure worked hard and long).

As our reserve units become more experienced, the elite ones can form a “Bonkers Brigade” to assist any Canadian community, when invited to do so.

No this is not similar to the British hiring Hessian regiments to put down the American Revolution. Nor is it similar to the statement of the great Napoleon- “Give ‘em a whiff of grapeshot” (I don’t think he was alluding to wine or brandy).

Let’s give our willing reservists the opportunity to help protect Canadians, their property, and above all, to assist our police. We will be a stronger community.

G.B. Miller

Shirley

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