After winning the Canadian championship, Corissa Sivorot training hard to top her personal best at the world chammpionships in Seoul, South Korea. (Gazette file photo)

Kettlebell athlete brings home gold from world event

Women centre stage at event in Seoul

Corissa Sivorot isn’t surprised there are still many people who have no idea what the sport of kettlebell lifting involves and who might be taken aback at the exploding popularity of the sport.

But the Metchosin resident, who recently returned from the Word Kettlebell Sport Championships in Seoul, South Korea with a gold medal, is confident the sport will continue to grow and is anxious to continue to represent Canada in future competitions.

She is also intent on passing along her knowledge of the sport to others, confident of the benefits that kettlebell lifting offers, not only in developing strength but its cardiovascular and general fitness benefits as well.

RELATED: World championships in Seoul on Langford lifter’s horizon

The brightly coloured kettlebells (each colour represents an different weight) look, for all intents and purposes, like cannonballs with handles.

They range in weight from about five kilograms to 60 kg or more for training purposes, but in competition, while competitors can still select their own weights, athletes most commonly compete with weights in the range of about 32 kg for men and 24 kg for women. Competitors are ranked based on the weight they lift, their body weight category and the specific lift they perform, such as a snatch, jerk or long cycle.

Sivorot’s training partner, Sarah Hunter, explained that the original kettlebells were probably developed in ancient Greece.

“They’ve been around for a really long time and we’ve just rediscovered them in North America. And women like Corissa are showing the world what women can do,” said Hunter.

And, although the sport of kettlebell lifting is a relative newcomer to North America, it has been around in Russia and other parts of Europe for more than 70 years.

The modern incarnation of the sport really began in 1988 at the first international competition and women weren’t allowed into international competition until the dawn of the 21st century. Since then, they have consistently shown that they are just as capable and competitive as the men.

Sivorot first competed in the world competition in Ireland in 2015 where she placed eighth and, this July, she won best in her weight and class, at the Canadian National Championship in Saskatchewan.

“It was really thrilling to compete in Seoul. We were in the Olympic handball stadium with more than 400 competitors from around the world. And the crowds really took interest in the women’s double kettlebell lift since it’s the first time the women have competed in that event. It was amazing, really, with lights and music,” said a beaming Sivorot.

But she’s not one to rest on her laurels. Sivorot continues to train with Hunter and the two (along with six others from the West Shore Kettlebell Club) intend to go to the next big competition in California in February for the World Federation of Kettlebell Sport Clubs competition. It’s another chance to show off the amazing strength and fitness level she’s developed as a kettlebell athlete.

Sivorot is a co-owner of the Westshore Warehouse, a private fitness facility in Langford, where she offers personal training and fitness classes.

“We offer all kinds of fitness instruction here, and certainly don’t just concentrate on kettlebell training. But I can say that I’ve tried all kinds of fitness and sport activities but it’s been kettlebell sport that’s really given me the excitement and challenge I was looking for,” she said. “It’s a great workout and a great sport, and I’m proud to represent Canada to the world in these competitions.”


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

editor@goldstreamgazette.com

Just Posted

Greater Victoria sees lowest rainfall numbers for November in decades

Only a third of the expected rainfall was seen across the Capital Region

UVic researchers develop industry-changing ‘hyper-glue’

‘Cross-linking’ technology already playing a role in performance body armour

Trend to convert lawns to meadows and gardens reaches Oak Bay

Front yard ‘food production,’ a piece of the puzzle

West Shore sees drop in traffic violations

The 315 violations in first six months of the year represent a 42 per cent decrease from 2018

Cloudy with a chance of showers ahead for Thursday

Plus a look ahead at the weekend’s forecast

VIDEO: A brief history of bumps in the Trudeau-Trump relationship

Remember Peter Navarro saying ‘there’s a special place in hell’ for a foreign leader who aims to cheat?

11 Sooke events to get you into the holiday spirit

From a Santa parade to classicial music, Sooke has it all

Vancouver Island town to star in new Syfy series: Resident Alien

Ladysmith will play the role of Patience, Colorado in the series

Half of shoppers say they have no holiday spending budget

B.C. consumers surveyed estimate they will spend $921 this season

Opening day delayed at Mount Washington

Dec. 6 was set as opening day but will now be delayed due to lack of snow.

Province begins forfeiture of Shawnigan contaminated soil site

The forfeiture proceedings do not impact the closure plan for the landfill site

Man killed in crash due to ‘absolutely treacherous’ conditions on Coquihalla

Winter means icy roads are dangerous and drivers should be careful, RCMP say

Former Burns Lake mayor gets two years for sexual assaults against minors

The Crown is seeking four to six years federal time; the defence wants 18 months in provincial jail

Bag of cocaine left in Vancouver Island grocery store aisle

RCMP: ‘We sure would like to talk to’ person who left drugs behind

Most Read