After winning the Canadian championship, Corissa Sivorot training hard to top her personal best at the world chammpionships in Seoul, South Korea. (Gazette file photo)

After winning the Canadian championship, Corissa Sivorot training hard to top her personal best at the world chammpionships in Seoul, South Korea. (Gazette file photo)

Kettlebell athlete brings home gold from world event

Women centre stage at event in Seoul

Corissa Sivorot isn’t surprised there are still many people who have no idea what the sport of kettlebell lifting involves and who might be taken aback at the exploding popularity of the sport.

But the Metchosin resident, who recently returned from the Word Kettlebell Sport Championships in Seoul, South Korea with a gold medal, is confident the sport will continue to grow and is anxious to continue to represent Canada in future competitions.

She is also intent on passing along her knowledge of the sport to others, confident of the benefits that kettlebell lifting offers, not only in developing strength but its cardiovascular and general fitness benefits as well.

RELATED: World championships in Seoul on Langford lifter’s horizon

The brightly coloured kettlebells (each colour represents an different weight) look, for all intents and purposes, like cannonballs with handles.

They range in weight from about five kilograms to 60 kg or more for training purposes, but in competition, while competitors can still select their own weights, athletes most commonly compete with weights in the range of about 32 kg for men and 24 kg for women. Competitors are ranked based on the weight they lift, their body weight category and the specific lift they perform, such as a snatch, jerk or long cycle.

Sivorot’s training partner, Sarah Hunter, explained that the original kettlebells were probably developed in ancient Greece.

“They’ve been around for a really long time and we’ve just rediscovered them in North America. And women like Corissa are showing the world what women can do,” said Hunter.

And, although the sport of kettlebell lifting is a relative newcomer to North America, it has been around in Russia and other parts of Europe for more than 70 years.

The modern incarnation of the sport really began in 1988 at the first international competition and women weren’t allowed into international competition until the dawn of the 21st century. Since then, they have consistently shown that they are just as capable and competitive as the men.

Sivorot first competed in the world competition in Ireland in 2015 where she placed eighth and, this July, she won best in her weight and class, at the Canadian National Championship in Saskatchewan.

“It was really thrilling to compete in Seoul. We were in the Olympic handball stadium with more than 400 competitors from around the world. And the crowds really took interest in the women’s double kettlebell lift since it’s the first time the women have competed in that event. It was amazing, really, with lights and music,” said a beaming Sivorot.

But she’s not one to rest on her laurels. Sivorot continues to train with Hunter and the two (along with six others from the West Shore Kettlebell Club) intend to go to the next big competition in California in February for the World Federation of Kettlebell Sport Clubs competition. It’s another chance to show off the amazing strength and fitness level she’s developed as a kettlebell athlete.

Sivorot is a co-owner of the Westshore Warehouse, a private fitness facility in Langford, where she offers personal training and fitness classes.

“We offer all kinds of fitness instruction here, and certainly don’t just concentrate on kettlebell training. But I can say that I’ve tried all kinds of fitness and sport activities but it’s been kettlebell sport that’s really given me the excitement and challenge I was looking for,” she said. “It’s a great workout and a great sport, and I’m proud to represent Canada to the world in these competitions.”


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

editor@goldstreamgazette.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Paul Lewis is the Goldstream Gazette’s 2021 Local Hero as Arts Advocate of the Year. (Don Denton/Black Press Media)
West Shore driftwood sculptor inspired by Esquimalt Lagoon

Paul Lewis is the 2021 Arts Advocate of the Year

Wildlife advocate Gary Schroyen captured this picture of a one-year-old cougar in the Sooke Hills using a homemade trip camera. Vancouver Island is home to approximately 800 cougars, which makes up about a quarter of the total population in B.C. (Gary Schroyen photo)
Declining Vancouver Island cougar populations linked to wolves

Large carnivore specialist says human development still plays biggest role on cougar numbers

Cathy Armstrong, executive director of the Land Conservancy, Paul Nursey CEO of Destination Greater Victoria and Saanich Coun. Susan Brice helped to kick off the annual Greater Victoria Flower Count at Abkhazi Garden Monday. This year, the flower count is less about rubbing the region’s weather in the rest of Canada’ faces, and more about extending a bouquet of compassion and love. (Nina Grossman/News Staff)
2021 Greater Victoria Flower Count sows seeds of compassion

Friendly flower count competition runs from March 3 to 10

Robert Schram, here seen in January 2016, died Saturday, according to a friend. (Black Press Media file photo)
Sidney, Saanich Peninsula mourn the death of Mr. Beads

Bead artist Robert Schram was a familiar, well-loved figure in Sidney and beyond

Langley resident Carrie MacKay shared a video showing how stairs are a challenge after spending weeks in hospital battling COVID-19 (Special to Langley Advance Times)
VIDEO: Stairs a challenge for B.C. woman who chronicled COVID-19 battle

‘I can now walk for six (to) 10 minutes a day’

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates B.C.’s coronavirus situation, May 8, 2020. (B.C. government photo)
B.C.’s weekend COVID-19 cases: 532 Saturday, 508 Sunday, 438 Monday

Fraser Health still has most, eight more coronavirus deaths

B.C. Attorney General David Eby speaks in the legislature, Dec. 7, 2020. Eby was given responsibility for housing after the October 2020 provincial election. (Hansard TV)
B.C. extends COVID-19 rent freeze again, to the end of 2021

‘Renoviction’ rules tightened, rent capped to inflation in 2022

Face mask hangs from a rear-view mirror. (Black Press image)
B.C. CDC unveils guide on how to carpool during the pandemic

Wearing masks, keeping windows open key to slowing the spread of COVID-19

Churches, including Langley’s Riverside Calvary Church, are challenging the regulations barring them from holding in-person worship services during COVID-19. (Langley Advance Times file)
Det. Sgt. Jim Callender. (Hamilton Police Service screenshot)
B.C. man dead, woman seriously injured after shooting in Hamilton, Ont.

The man was in the process of moving to the greater Toronto area, police say

Police have identified the vehicle involved in the Feb. 14 hit-and-run in Chemainus and are continuing to investigate. (Black Press Media files)
Police seize and identify suspect vehicle in hit-and-run

Investigation into death expected to be lengthy and involved

(Black Press file photo)
Child in critical condition, homicide investigators probe incident near Agassiz

The child was transported to hospital but is not expected to survive

Sewage plant in Lower Mainland, operated by Metro Vancouver. (Metro Vancouver screenshot)
‘Poop tracker’ launches as researchers test Lower Mainland sewage water for COVID-19

‘Studying the virus in wastewater allows researchers to look at an entire population…’

Most Read