The Pat Quinn Classic has been a popular tournament for top bantam and peewee teams in recent years, but COVID-19 means there will be no physical event this season. The scholarships established by the tournament are carrying on. (Pat Quinn Classic photo)

The Pat Quinn Classic has been a popular tournament for top bantam and peewee teams in recent years, but COVID-19 means there will be no physical event this season. The scholarships established by the tournament are carrying on. (Pat Quinn Classic photo)

Pat Quinn Classic scholarships continue even as COVID cancels tournament

Female and male bantam players province wide are encouraged to apply for $1,000 scholarships

Bantam hockey players from across the province are encouraged to apply for scholarships through the Pat Quinn Classic tournament.

While there will be no physical tournament this year thanks to COVID-19, organizers are still selecting three players to win $1,000 to be applied to post-secondary schooling.

In any other year, players would only be eligible for the scholarships if they played in the annual tournament in Burnaby, but 2020 has been anything but normal. Opening the scholarships up to the entire province is a way to find light in an otherwise dark situation.

“We know this year has been very difficult,” said Cliff Ronning, a former Vancouver Canucks who played for Quinn and now serves as honourary chair of the Pat Quinn Classic. “We also know many young hockey players have risen to the challenge by studying hard, being good teammates on the ice, and finding ways to take care of others in their community.

”It’s important that we reward these efforts and help them achieve their academic goals.”

READ MORE: Canucks legend Pat Quinn dies at 71; ‘We have lost a great man’ says Linden

The Pat Quinn Classic is one of the longest running hockey tournaments in the world, though it has only existed in its current form since 2015.

The international tourney for bantams and peewees dates 58 years back to 1962, but it was renamed five years ago after the passing of legendary hockey coach Pat Quinn. Affectionately known by many as ‘The Big Irishman,’ Quinn died in November of 2014 at the age of 71, and the tournament was re-imagined as a way to carry forward his passion for developing great athletes and leaders.

“”Not only have we created an exceptional tournament with terrific hockey, we have made leadership and academic success foundational to the tournament,” Ronning said. “Pat would be proud that we are using this platform to inspire the next generation of leaders.”

READ MORE: Chilliwack skaters lead Canucks to Earle Sinkie Trophy

Quinn was a two-time winner of the Jack Adams Trophy as the National Hockey League coach of the year and was revered in Vancouver as the architect of the 1994 Stanley Cup finalist Canucks.

He spent 42 years of his life as an NHL player (1968-77), coach or general manager (1977-2010).

Internationally, Quinn guided Team Canada to gold medals at the 2002 Winter Olympics, 2008 World U18 Championships and 2009 World Junior Championship. He added a World Cup title in 2004.

Quinn was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2016 as a builder.

“I was fortunate to consider Pat a friend and mentor, and that’s what fuels my passion and commitment to this tournament,” Ronning said.

The Pat Quinn Classic is run in partnership with the Vancouver Canucks Alumni Association.

Two scholarships are sponsored by the Vancouver Canucks Alumni under the names of Quinn and Ronning, both members of the BC Hockey Hall of Fame.

The third scholarship is under the name of Kirk McLean and sponsored by Gary Pooni of Brook Pooni Associates. McLean is also a BC Hockey Hall of Famer and he is a member of the Canucks Ring of Honour.

Six thousand dollars in scholarships have been awarded to six students over the past two years.

This year, male and female bantams have until Jan. 21 to apply at patquinnclassic.com/scholarshps/apply-now/

hockeyScholarships

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

In January, six flights with cases of COVID-19 onboard have landed at the Victoria International Airport so far. (Black Press Media file photo)
Two new COVID-19 exposures reported on flights to Victoria

A Jan. 10 flight from Toronto and Jan. 11 flight from Calgary were affected

West Shore RCMP are looking for a suspect and their mini van, which crashed into a parked vehicle and home along the 200-block of Island Highway in View Royal on Jan. 18. (Black Press Media file photo)
Driver crashes into parked car and home in View Royal, speeds away: RCMP

Incident took place near 200-block of Island Highway Monday night

A pinniped was attacked by an unseen predator off the shores of Dallas Road Monday night. (Courtesy of Steffani Cameron)
VIDEO: Seal attacked by unseen predator in waters off Dallas Road

Victoria woman captures harrowing footage of what appears to be a seal’s final moments

Firefighters respond to a fire on Heatherly Road in Colwood Jan. 19. (Photo courtesy of View Royal Fire Rescue)
Two people escape injury in Colwood house fire

Heatherly Road fire started on a covered porch

The Starbucks in Langford’s Westshore Town Centre is one of almost 300 storefronts that the U.S. coffee giant will be shutting across Canada by the end of March. (Google Maps)
Langford’s Westshore Town Centre Starbucks to close permanently

Popular coffee chain to close 300 storefronts across Canada by end of March

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry prepares a daily update on the coronavirus pandemic, April 21, 2020. (B.C. Government)
B.C. adjusts COVID-19 vaccine rollout for delivery slowdown

Daily cases decline over weekend, 31 more deaths

JaHyung Lee, “Canada’s oldest senior” at 110 years old, received his first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine on Thursday, Jan. 14, 2021. He lives at Amenida Seniors Community in Newton. (Submitted photo: Amenida Seniors Community)
COVID rapid tests in long-term care key during vaccine rollout: B.C. care providers

‘Getting kits into the hands of care providers should be a top priority,’ says former Health Minister

Island Health chief medical officer Dr. Richard Stanwick receives a first dose of Pfizer vaccine, Dec. 22, 2020. (B.C. government)
B.C. turns to second doses of COVID-19 vaccine as supplies slow

Pfizer shipments down until February, to be made up in March

B.C.’s Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Training announced funding to train community mental health workers at four B.C. post-secondary institutions. (Stock photo)
B.C. funding training of mental health workers at four post-secondary institutions

Provincial government says pandemic has intensified need for mental health supports

A health-care worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Toronto on Thursday, January 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
No Pfizer vaccines arriving in Canada next week; feds still expect 4M doses by end of March

More cases of U.K. variant, South African variant found in Canada

Health-care workers wait in line at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Toronto on Thursday, January 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Canadians who have had COVID-19 should still get the vaccine, experts say

Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines were found to have a 95 per cent efficacy

An empty Peel and Sainte-Catherine street is shown in Montreal, Saturday, Jan. 9, 2021, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
Poll finds strong support for COVID-19 curfews despite doubts about effectiveness

The poll suggests 59 per cent remain somewhat or very afraid of contracting COVID-19

Egg producers in B.C. aren’t obligated to reveal their production sites. (Sarah Simpson/Citizen)
Officials say there’s not enough Vancouver Island eggs to meet demand

BC Egg Marketing Board doesn’t regulate labelling, supply needed from off-Island

Most Read