A Sooke Martial Arts Association class practicing at the Sooke Community Hall dojo.

Sooke martial arts a family affair

With martial arts, it is often said that the student eventually becomes the teacher. And that is exactly what happened with the Sooke Martial Arts Association.

With martial arts, it is often said that the student eventually becomes the teacher. And that is exactly what happened with the Sooke Martial Arts Association.

Starting as a club over 30 years ago, Sooke Martial Arts became a registered non-profit organization last November. Started by Ian Milne and then taken over by Jim Beckett, it is currently headed by sensei Carl Scott, who was actually a student as a child, said fellow sensei and instructor Nicky Logins.

“Carl has been with the club since he was 11 years old, he’s got his own kids now,” said Logins.

As an organization, instead of having one owner, the responsibilities of day-to-day operations are now looked after by families and the seven instructors, like Logins who also has been with the club for several years.

“I watched my kids do it for two years and I couldn’t sit there watching anymore, and when I did start it was just so much fun and so empowering that I stayed with it, and now I’m the only one that’s left,” she said, laughing.

Her entire family attained high levels in shotokan karate, the style of martial arts originating from Okinawa, Japan that the organization teaches. Students learn all the forms, also called kata, that include sparring, self defence and weapons technique, as well as discipline and respect. There are seven belt levels leading up to black, or teacher level: white, yellow, orange, green, blue, brown.

It’s not necessary for newcomers to have any previous experience, and Logins said it’s just as much for parents, uncles and aunts as it is for youngsters. Ages of students range from five to 65.

“We like to promote the idea that martial arts is really a family affair,” she said, who added there are quite a few families that practice together.

“We forget how much fun (the kids are) having.”

Sooke Martial Arts practices on Mondays and Thursdays out of their dojo at the community hall on Shields Road. There are two streams — junior (age five to 10) classes are from 6 to 6:45 p.m. with seniors (10 and up) right after from 7 until around 8 p.m.

 

Just Posted

Port Renfrew man charged with animal cruelty

Hot coffee poured on dog’s face, say police

Sooke cougar sighting unconfirmed

Boy had a close encounter with the big cat

Central Saanich makes moves to alieviate business transit concerns

Councillor calls for enhanced service and long-term transit passes

Saanich sponsors Jeux de la Francophonie giving $50,000 for the French-language Games

Couns. Susan Brice and Nathalie Chambers opposed funding, citing substantive and procedural concerns

VIDEO: B.C. MLA Michelle Stilwell takes first steps in nearly 30 years

‘It actually felt like walking. It’s been 27 years… but it felt realistic to me’

Report of dead body in B.C. park actually headless sex doll

This discovery, made at Manning Park on July 10, led police to uncovering two other sex mannequins

Grand Forks fire chief found to have bullied, harassed volunteer firefighter: report

WorkSafeBC, third-party human resources investigation looking into allegations complete

Taekwondo instructor, 21, identified as B.C. bat rabies victim

Nick Major, 21, an instructor at Cascadia Martial Arts in Parksville

15-year-old with imitation gun caused ‘dynamic’ scene at Nanaimo mall

No one was harmed in Monday’s incident, say Nanaimo RCMP

B.C. on right road with tougher ride-hailing driver rules, says expert

The provincial government is holding firm that ride-hailing drivers have a Class 4 licence

RCMP investigating alleged ‘sexual misconduct’ by cyclist on BCIT campus

BCIT said they were reviewing video evidence of the incident

New home cost dips in B.C.’s large urban centres

Victoria, Kelowna, Vancouver prices decline from last year

Graphic suicide scene edited out of ‘13 Reasons Why’ finale

Suicide prevention groups support the decision

Most Read