Sooke swimmers welcome new coach

Former Californian takes post as swim coach in Sooke

  • Sep. 11, 2013 10:00 a.m.

There is a new wind blowing in this season for the Island Swimming programs here at SEAPARC in Sooke.

A highly seasoned professional coach has been hired to take over to stabilize and grow the programs.

Frank Comerford, who recently moved to Sooke from California, has coached for more than 30 years in Canada, the U.S. and overseas.  He has developed and coached athletes to local, national and international success.

The new programs will be based on the latest scientific information so the swimmers can learn how to succeed in a non-threatening environment.  The new learn-to-swim program is based on achieving new skills while having lots of fun and excitement.

A new Masters (for people over 19) who wish to get into and stay physically fit and/or compete and get very sociable will be started.

Comerford will also be initiating a triathlete training program (swimming) because swimming is usually the weakest part of most triathlete’s skills.  Comerford is certified by the American Swimming Coaches Association as a “Distinguished Professional Coach, International.”

Comerford and Island Swimming welcomes all current and potential swimmers to join them this year and be a part of a growing successful program here in Sooke.

There will be a meet the coach night at SEAPARC next Thursday at 7 p.m. for all current and new swimmers/parents.  Program information (including registration) will be provided and an opportunity to ask Comerford questions.

As a bit of a preview to some common questions is the answer to the question, what’s in competitive swimming for my child? Comerford provides the following details.

Swimming is the second most popular exercise activity in Canada.  Over 200,000 young people participate in competitive swimming, with most being introduced to the sport through summer swim leagues.  75,000 athletes in 400 year round clubs participate in Swimming Canada, which is the national governing body for competitive swimming.  Swimming is the most successful/celebrated sport for Canada in summer Olympic competitions.

Competitive swimming is an ideal activity for young people as it meets the goals for children’s organized sports cited by many experts:

Learning motor skills

Increasing physical activity levels

Learning social skills

Learning good sportsmanship

Having fun

Swimming is considered the ideal physical activity because:

Swimming is a low impact activity and reduces stress on the joints – it is the most injury-free sport for children;

Swimming develops coordination by requiring complex muscle movement involving all parts of the body;

Swimming builds cardiac and respiratory fitness and develops aerobic endurance;

Swimming promotes muscle development and burns calories, a particular concern with increasing rates of childhood obesity;

Swimming can be continued for a lifetime;

Swimming is a sport that children with disabilities can participate in.

In addition to the extensive physical benefits, competitive swimming also benefits young people by:

Providing a supportive, wholesome social outlet;

Learning sportsmanship, including dealing with winning and losing;

Developing team camaraderie and close friendships, many for life;

Learning goal setting, self-discipline and self-confidence;

Time-management: competitive swimmers are among the best students.

Aside from the physical, social and developmental benefits, competitive swimming is a fun and exciting sport for young people.

With notes

submitted by Frank Comerford

 

 

SEAPARC Aquatic Centre includes a six-lane, 25-metre competition pool, leisure pool, swirl pool, sauna and pool viewing area.

SEAPARC is proud to use salt purification in the pool. No more gas chlorine, which means the water is softer on skin, eyes and hair, and also easier on the colours in your bathing suit.

SEAPARC has a number of swim programs, contact the complex to see which may suit ,you or your children.

SEAPARC Leisure Complex hours:

Monday – Friday     6:15 a.m.  to 9:00 p.m.

Saturday     8a.m.      to 8 p.m.

Sunday     9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

250-642-8000

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