The Outdoor Guy

The Outdoor Guy

Sooke's Ron Larson writes about his adventures outdoors

I hit a deer. I was driving down to French Beach around sunset when all of a sudden I spotted the firefly eyes on the right. I have lived around here long enough to know that deer like to pal around. I immediately made the decision to slow, then whap thud. A blur wrapped in brown and white, moving left to right, from the opposite side of the road ran run infront of my van. As the unfortunate say, “I never saw it coming”.

Emily Dickenson wrote that a wounded deer leaps highest, implying that our will for survival or love will supersede our rational mind and in that moment we are capable of amazing things. When an animal is killed to feed one’s family there is a certain amount of personal pride in that and some young kids may think their parent is amazing for providing for them. Some kids may not.

What everyone can probably agree on is how there is a certain amount of shame and embarrassment when you accidentally kill an animal, especially one with big beautiful eyes. When you become an accidental predator what is the protocol, what if it’s still alive? I pulled over and stepped out of my van and doubled back, the deer was dead, unfortunately and thankfully. I was thankful that I didn’t have to see her suffer, selfish I know, but that’s the truth.

I called the police to report and took some pictures to chronicle the accident, insurance and such. The police and insurance companies receive a lot of calls about animal impacts this time of year. The lowlight combined with mating season makes for some dangerous situations.

The purpose of this article isn’t to offer a tip or two on how to avoid deer on the road, obviously I’m no expert. What I will offer instead is a tip on how to hunt deer first though make sure you’re legal. B.C. residents 18 years of age or older who wish to obtain a hunting licence are required to complete the CORE Program. The program consists of a practical firearms handling test and a written test.

The tip: New research suggests you should avoid wearing anything blue or camouflage with a lot of white, because white reflects all colours, including blue. Because deer can’t perceive colour shades, a hunter wearing camouflage containing many subtle shades of green and/or brown looks just like one big blob to a deer and the motion will alert the deer. Instead, wear camouflage that breaks up your outline and make sure your detergent isn’t scented and doesn’t have any whiteners.

In conclusion, feel awesome if you’ve shot and killed a deer to feed your family. If you have killed one with your car, it’s ok to feel terrible after all Mother Nature doesn’t wear black and white, she wears camouflage.

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