An enthusiastic client enjoys skimming the treetops on a zipline.

Ziplining good for adrenaline and fundraising boost

On Saturday September 14, Sooke’s Adrena LINE Zipline Adventure Tours raised over $1,700 for Autism Speaks Canada.

What can be more relaxing than zipping around the tree line in in Sooke, tethered to a single line with nothing but a hook and a harness? Well, a lot of things come to mind. But throw in a charitable fundraiser, and the giggles and gasps are sure to blast the rewards through the roof.

On Saturday September 14, Sooke’s Adrena LINE Zipline Adventure Tours raised over $1,700 for Autism Speaks Canada.

“We were approached by Pivot Point with the opportunity,” said Sarah Mitchell, the community and office coordinator at Adrena LINE, in conversation. “One in 88 kids are diagnosed with autism these days.”

The funds were raised by donating a portion of the proceeds of all business that came through the door that day.

Adrena LINE is involved in a number of fundraising activities throughout the year.

“We’ve been an ongoing supporter of the Tour de Rock,” elaborated Mitchell. “We also have a fundraiser this weekend for the Victoria Prostate Centre. And every spring, on Earth Day, we have a fundraiser that supports The Land Conservancy.”

Adrena LINE has been in business since 2007, and Mitchell herself participates in the sport.

“It’s an activity that gets people outside, and that anyone can do.”

Mitchell says the tour in Sooke has been designed for just about everyone.

“You do have to be able to walk a few stairs, and you have to have the use of one arm, to hold on.” Their guides, says Mitchell, do all of the work.

Ziplining is for anyone aged five and older. Last year, boasts Mitchell, they had a woman complete the tour on her 95th birthday. The only restriction is for weight. To ride solo, you must be over 60 pounds. Their lines can accommodate a maximum of 275 pounds. And if you are a five-year-old under 60 (pounds, that is), you will ride in tandem with a zipline trainer.

The standard tour takes two hours and involves eight ziplines, two suspension bridges, and a 10 minute ATV ride. As they articulate on their website (adrenalinezip.com), “At Adrena LINE Zipline Adventure Tours, experience an exhilarating ride up to 60km/hr as you soar up to 150 feet off the ground on eight scenic ziplines ranging from 150 feet to an unforgettable 1,000 feet.”

Sounds scary?

“Most people are afraid of heights when they come here,” assured Mitchell. “The very first line that you do is the Trainer’s zipline. It’s short, and it’s close to the ground, and it’s where we train you in what’s expected and what the procedures are. There’s a lot of screaming on that first line.”

To which Mitchell adds, it’s normal. “I don’t think that anyone approaches a ledge on top of a tree and goes, ‘Oh, yeah, I’m fine with this.’ “

And if zipping around on the top of the treelike isn’t scary enough for you, they have an upcoming Haunted Halloween Zip tour coming up. Haunted. At night.

This most recent fundraiser by Adrena LINE was done in support of the fundraising efforts of Pivot Point Family Growth Centre to raise funds for Autism Speaks Canada. The Pivot Point Family Growth Centre will be participating in the upcoming “Walk Now for Autism Speaks” in Vancouver on Sunday, September 29.

For more information about their tours or fundraising efforts, visit adrenalinezip.com.

 

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