Pink Shirt Day campaign urges Canadians to ‘Lift Each Other Up’

Annual anti-bullying effort returns Wednesday, Feb. 26

Pink Shirt Day is Feb. 26.

Whether it’s rose, bubble gum or flamingo, the power of pink is once again on display.

Today (Wednesday, Feb. 26) marks Pink Shirt Day, a date when each year Canadians are asked to take a stand against bullying – and to make that stance public by including an article of pink clothing in their ensemble.

Each February, the national movement sees thousands of Canadians wear pink to show their support for safe and inclusive schools, workplaces and communities, according to a release from London Drugs, the campaign’s retail sponsor. This year’s theme, “Lift Each Other Up” reflects the origins of Pink Shirt Day, which began in Eastern Canada 13 years ago.

In 2007, two Nova Scotia students took action after witnessing a younger student being bullied for wearing a pink shirt to school. The students bought 50 pink T-shirts and encouraged schoolmates to wear them and send a powerful message of solidarity to the bully.

Since 2008, through the sale of the shirts, $1.5 million has been raised for a number of anti-bully programs, including Kids Help Phone, KidSafe Project and Boys and Girls Clubs of Western Canada.

According to pinkshirtday.ca, one in five kids is affected by bullying and last year, more than 59,000 youth were impacted by Pink Shirt Day-funded programs.

“We want to encourage every Western Canadian to share the positive message of Pink Shirt Day this year,” said Clint Mahlman, London Drugs president and COO.

This year’s T-shirts, which feature a rocket ship blasting off and the phrase “Lift Each Other Up,” are now available at all London Drugs locations across Western Canada in youth or adult sizes.

Net proceeds are distributed through CKNW Kids’ Fund to support youth anti-bullying programs across B.C., Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Sales from shirts are donated to community programs in each provincial market for community programs that include anti-bullying initiatives.

Check out last year’s Pink Shirt Day event at the B.C. Legislature:

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Pink Shirt Day

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Victoria police investigating chop-shop found in Beacon Hill Park

Police asking public to register bikes with them in case lost or stolen

Island Health issues Victoria overdose advisory

Health authority warns of increase in overdoses from opioids and stimulants

West Shore RCMP responds after reports of man masturbating on bus

52-year-old man charged with committing an indecent act in a public place

Central Saanich council spills plans for alcohol in public parks

Local expert Adam Sherk praises decision, warns of liberalization

Recent surge in COVID-19 cases not unexpected amid Phase Three of reopening: B.C.’s top doc

Keep circles small, wear masks and be aware of symptoms, Dr. Bonnie Henry says

B.C. NDP changing WorkSafeBC regulations to respond to COVID-19

Employers say reclassifying coronavirus could be ‘ruinous’

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers wanted list for the week of July 13

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

Statistical flaws led to B.C. wolf cull which didn’t save endangered caribou as estimated

Study finds statistical flaws in an influential 2019 report supporting a wolf cull

Windows broken, racist graffiti left on Okanagan home

Family says nothing like this has happened since they moved to Summerland in 1980s

Beloved Island woman dies at 106

Dorothy Adair adored by the many people she met in Chemainus in two short years

Man arrested for allegedly pushing unsuspecting seniors, jumping on cars at Parksville mall

Cops arrest man after ‘aggressive incident’ at Wembley Mall in Parksville

B.C. man who went by ‘Doctor Ray Gaglardi’ charged with sex assault of teenage boys

The man, 75, is accused of assaulting teenage boys he met through Coquitlam-area churches

B.C.’s potential deficit $12.5 billion as spending spikes, taxes drop

Finance Minister Carole James gives COVID-19 outlook

Most Read