Letters to the editor – April 6

Weekly letters to the editor from within the Sooke community.

Cancelled sewer contract leaves stink

Re: District eyes end to EPCOR contract (News, March 30)

That didn’t take long, only last week they were mulling over the idea to end the contract, now it’s done. I will bet diamonds the projected savings are not realized once the sewer plant is run by the municipality.

More importantly, council should be a lot more engaged in providing full sewer services to the rest of Sooke. I’m sure no one imagined it would be 10 years after the core went on sewers, for the rest of us not to even get a mention.

All the reasons to build the sewer system in the first place are still with us today. Failing septic fields, run-off into the harbour, yet there seems to be no interest from council to address these issues.

It’s time, get on with it.

Al Carter, Sooke

 

Climate activism not what you think

Climate scare-monger David Suzuki exposed himself on Australian TV as ignorant of the subject.

He did not know of the climate temperature databases used to support what he claims. I think he is listening to others instead of doing science himself.

“Alternative energy” schemes are pork-barreling – they failed in Ontario (in part due government interference), hurt small investors in southwest Europe when government reneged on its promise of inflated prices to small generators, heavily subsidized in many places yet still failing, with equipment wearing out prematurely due to notions of solar power generating large amounts of power ignore the vast area needed for the panels.

David Suzuki has a history of making claims that he removes from his web site when challenged by people like Vivian Krause and I.

Keith Sketchley, Saanich

 

Smell the roses in your own community

Re: Sooke stonewalled on severance settlements (Opinion, March 30)

An interesting letter from a Victoria resident concerning our property taxes and re-alignment of the staff at city hall.

I always wonder what motivates these people to try and “stir the pot” in other communities. Is it the “big city” mentality dictating to smaller communities? In this case i think not, i suspect jealousy on how things are running so smoothly in Sooke.

Perhaps if the letter writer could take time to participate in Victoria’s annual flower count, take time to smell the roses, a more positive attitude might emerge.

Mike Thomas, Sooke

 

Thanks for fulfilling a delicious request

I recently moved to Sooke.  I was going to attend my mother-in-law’s 95th birthday celebration. An Irish Soda bread was her request.

Sounds simple enough you think.  I called every bakery in Victoria but no one made it or was willing to. I was absolutely thrilled when I discovered the Little Vienna Bakery (which operates in my own “back yard”) was willing to make it for me even though they were swamped.

When I explained that it was for this special occasion the owner said she would make time for it.

Needless to say my mother-in-law was very grateful. With that kind of customer service and care, in my opinion Little Vienna is a winning business and will definitely have my business.

Lorraine Knowles, Sooke

 

Plant mechanics must be taken into account

I believe a single plant is by far the best option. Also for future expansion, usage of waste heat and low cost, the best site by far is Macaulay Point pump station, as it already has the outfall and is surrounded by acres of vacant land owned by the feds that is not being used.

Clover Point is a totally dumb idea as it is too small, will be dangerous for workers and operators and very expensive to maintain.

Also there will be issues with dewatering during construction and after it is built. Sewage and other industrial plants with restricted access, especially those with huge switchgear and high voltage equipment, are bad news. The mayors have so screwed this up is unbelievable.

Note, I am a retired mechanical contractor with extensive experience in the CRD sewage plants, as my company completed major work in all of them over the years.

Wilfred Sheuer, Esquimalt

 

Cut flow of money, get a handle on the situation

It appears that whenever we point to money being the heart of an issue, we require triple bypass surgery.

First to bypass the salivating consultants, second to bypass the legal hawks with mounting billable hours and third to avoid the boasts of ill-informed politicos, all to eager to spend from the public purse.

I suggest a triple bypass to get to the real heart of this issue.

Ryan Gisler, Saanich