D.A.R.E. supported by service clubs

Program on drug awareness gets financial help in Sooke

September is fast approaching. The berries are almost finished for the year and bears begin to look for other food sources. Apples and other fruit bearing trees begin to ripen, and can potentially become a food choice for hungry bears if not managed correctly. Such fruit can attract bears to our backyards which can increase the potential for bear habituation and human-bear conflicts. Attracting bears to your yard can also result in bears obtaining other human foods such as garbage, pet food, compost, or bird seed.

The responsibility to manage fruit trees and wildlife sustainably falls to us. We plant fruit trees primarily for the beauty of the blossoms in the spring and to eat the sweet fruit in the fall, but we need to manage these trees responsibly. Phone calls to the Conservation Officer Service regarding conflicts with bears are on the rise in B.C. Taking a proactive approach to attractant management is a critical step to sharing our landscapes with wildlife safely and sustainably.

 

So what can we do?

– Pick fruit and allow it to ripen indoors or pick daily as it ripens. Do not allow windfall to accumulate on the ground.

– If you do not want the fruit, prune the tree vigorously to prevent blossoms or spray spring blossoms with a garden hose to knock them off.

– If you would like to make the fruit available to others, contact a local fruit exchange program, consider calling Sooke Food Chi or a fruit tree gleaning group to pick unwanted fruit, or donate to the food bank.

– Consider using electric fencing to protect your fruit trees.

– If you no longer want to manage your tree, consider replacement with a native, non-fruit bearing variety.

– Berries should be picked as they ripen.

– Consider replacing your berry bushes with native, non-fruiting varieties if you do not want the fruit.

 

Debbie Read

WildSafeBC Coordinator CRD Region

 

WildSafeBC is an educational program that encourages efforts by all to reduce human-wildlife conflicts.

 

Just Posted

PHOTOS: City of Colwood hosts a ‘heartwarming start’ to the holidays

Colwood Christmas Light Up Celebration sees surge in attendance

Trauma sufferers support group takes shape on West Shore

Aaron’s Society open to more peer support groups with certified trauma practitioners

Mental health call temporarily shuts down Trans Canada Highway in View Royal

West Shore RCMP cite 14 percent increase in calls concerning mental health in 2019

B.C. Transit saves $300,000, scores 28 used fareboxes idle in California

‘Someone joked maybe we can buy used fareboxes on eBay,’ CEO says

Tenants above Wellburns uncertain after ‘nightmare’ sewage flood ousts them indefinitely

Tenants evacuated after sewage flooded basement of century-old building

VIDEO: John Lennon’s iconic Rolls Royce rolls into Camosun College for checkup

Royal BC Museum, Camosun College and Coachwerks Restorations come together to care for car

VIDEO: Rockslide closes part of Highway 93 in Fairmont Hot Springs

Geotechnical team called in to do an assessment after rocks fell from hoodoos

Petition calls for appeal of ex-Burns Lake mayor’s sentence for sex assault

Prosecution service says Luke Strimbold’s case is under review

Northwest B.C. wildlife shelter rescues particularly tiny bear cub

Shelter co-founder says the cub weighs less than a third of what it should at this time of year

BC firefighters to help battle Australian bushfires

Canada sent 22 people, including 7 from B.C.

B.C. NDP touts the end of MSP premiums

Horgan, James held news conference to reiterate that people will get their last bill this month

Oscar Hickes: Longest running hockey tournament on Vancouver Island cancelled

Patrick Murray, one of the organizers for the tournament, broke the sad news on social media.

EMCS hosts winter concert

Concert Band will share its festival pieces

11 Sooke events to get you into the holiday spirit

From a Santa parade to classicial music, Sooke has it all

Most Read