Glinz Lake cabin.

Glinz Lake cabin hand built out of cedar

Hunting lodge on wilderness lake was the dream of two Swiss brothers

High on a knoll at Glinz Lake, this cabin was built by the two Swiss brothers whose name is remembered by a road we pass each time we drive Highway 14 to Victoria.  Sons of a Swiss hotelier, Leonard and Arnold Glinz arrived here in 1911, found a beautiful woodland lake and dreamed of building a hunting lodge.

There was no road access to the lake of course; so the resourceful brothers built their own, to bring supplies three miles upwards to the secluded semi-alpine setting. Built with 10-inch split cedar boards on a foundation of cedar logs, with a cedar shake roof, the cabin stood for many years, even serving as a caretaker’s home for the YMCA children’s camp that came after the Glinzes.

Trying to develop a hunting lodge was uphill work, and in 1917 the brothers saw an opportunity to operate Woodside Farm, home of the pioneer Muir family on West Coast Road, when it became available for lease. By 1920 Arnold Glinz and his wife Rosa had purchased Woodside Farm, while Leonard got a hotel management job in Vancouver.

Besides farming and dairying at Woodside, the Arnold Glinzes began a hospitality industry, with paying guests and chicken dinners served on summer Sundays. Their son Teddy Glinz attended Sooke School and grew up to marry Elsa, a sweetheart from Switzerland.

While elder brother Leonard Glinz worked in other cities, he kept the cabin at Glinz Lake for visits as a holiday and hunting retreat, until deciding in the 1930s to make it available for a children’s camp. Over the years, many Sooke youngsters have joined the hundreds who have enjoyed a week’s stay at Camp Thunderbird.

Besides the road name, the Glinz story continues as part of Sooke’s history, as Arnold’s grandson Charlie Glinz spends part of each year at the old Woodside farmhouse on West Coast Road. After Charlie’s dad passed away his mom Elsa married Phil Wilford, and the old farmhouse rings to the rafters with happy voices when Charlie’s half-siblings, the Wilford clan, get together to enjoy old-fashioned hospitality.

Elida Peers

Historian

Sooke Region Museum

Just Posted

Sooke Santa Run 2019 an inspiration

Loads of food for the food bank and a lot of smiles

500 pounds of turkey served at Cool Aid community Christmas dinner

Annual dinner serves hundreds of community members

VIDEO: Annual Tuba Christmas concert draws large crowd to Market Square

Over 100 tuba and euphonium players gathered to play festive tunes

Revisit Christmas past as Point Ellice House displays Victorian-era traditions

Antique bobbles, cards, decor and more are on display

Bold and brassy quintet touches down at UVic

Internationally recognized Canadian Brass performing with Victoria Symphony on Dec. 21

VIDEO: Success of wildlife corridors in Banff National Park has advocates wanting more

Demand for more highway protection escalated after seven elk were killed by a semi-trailer near Canmore

Fans sing Canadian anthem after sound system breaks at BMW IBSF World Cup

The Canadians in attendance made sure their team and flag were honoured on the podium

VIDEO: Fire destroys Big White Ski Resort chalet

Social media eulogies peg the property, nicknamed “The Pharamacy,” as both loved and hated

Prince George RCMP use bait packages to catch porch pirates over the holidays

First-in-Canada program with Amazon looks to combat parcel theft

Nanaimo mechanical engineer creates thief tracking program

Nanaimo Thief Tracking lets users plot and share information about thefts online

Mayor wants B.C. to institutionalize severely mental ill people who are homeless

Those suffering from mental health conditions, such as schizophrenia, need specialized care, mayor says

Five things of note from Trudeau’s mandate letters to his ministers

Some marching orders come from the Liberal Party’s campaign, while others are new additions

Scheer’s resignation tips party into internal war over school tuition payments

The Conservatives have a Toronto convention already scheduled for April

Navigating ‘fever phobia’: B.C. doctor gives tips on when a sick kid should get to the ER

Any temperature above 38 C is considered a fever, but not all cases warrant a trip to the hospital

Most Read