(Left to right) During rehearsals on May 10

Dinner/theatre British to the core

Sooke Harbour Players present Fawlty Towers 2 as dinner theatre

The Sooke Harbour Players will be presenting Fawlty Towers 2, A very British comedy dinner theatre, on May 26 and 27 at the Sooke Legion.

The onstage adaption of the 70s television show will feature two episodes called Waldorf Salad and A Touch of Class, divided into two different acts.

According to directors Steve Anderson and Sam Pasta, the theatrical rendition will follow the original script to a tee, delivering audiences with a genuine Fawlty Towers experience.

In addition to staying true to the series’ storyline, actors will shed their North American skin for a British demeanour and accent, where appropriate.

The cast of hotel staff will be played by the same actors throughout the production, while actors portraying guests will change per act. All roles have been filled by Sooke Harbour Players, which is a combination of veteran and novice performers.

The role of brash, unpleasant and frantic hotelier, Basil Fawlty, will be played by John Bidner, whose eye-widening performance is sure to have audience members keeling over with laughter.

In both acts, Basil navigates his way through the treacherous waters of customer service and hotel management. Basil hilariously flummoxes through each evening, attempting to satisfy demanding and eccentric guests.

Basil’s bossy but competent wife, Sybil Fawlty, is played by Danielle Allen.

The cheeky server, Polly Sherman, will be played by Nicole Syrard and the confused, but well-meaning Bacelonian server, Manuel, will be portrayed by Doug Inkpen.

The play will mainly take place in the restaurant dining area, kitchen and lobby of the Fawlty Towers hotel. The set is simple and modest, consisting of different dinner tables, a back kitchen prep area laden with food, and a tall wooden reception desk with an old fashioned rotary phone.

The dinner theatre will take place on May 26 and 27 at the Sooke Royal Canadian Legion. Doors open at 5:15 p.m. and curtains open at 6 p.m.

Tickets are $45, which includes the dinner and show, and are available at: Shoppers Drug Mart, People’s Drug Mart, The Stick  in the Mud Coffee House and Bill’s Food and Feed.

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