Kathy Edgar with her cedar and grass woven baskets

First Nations arts and craft at T’Sou-ke show

Doug Lafortune and Kakthy Edgar bring art to Sooke for local native show

Even if you wanted to get a table at the highly anticipated First Nations art show you would be out of luck. The tables have been reserved for months and there’s a waiting list says Linda Bristol.

Some of the best native artists in the area will be at the third annual T’ Sou-ke Art Show and Bake Sale on Saturday, Dec. 3.

“This is our third annual with the T’ Sou-ke arts group hosting,” says organizer Linda Bristol. “We will have several First Nations artists from out of town.”

The band hall on the T’Souke reserve is a small venue but the calibre of the artists is big. Doug LaFortune, a Coast Salish carver from the Tsawout band will be there with his art which includes carvings and prints.

Lafortune was born in Bellingham, WA, in 1953. After attending school in Victoria, he studied Fine Arts at Camosun College in 1970. Uncertain of his future path, he enrolled in a heavy equipment operators’ course and worked in logging until 1972. A visit to Simon Charlie’s workshop in Koksilah, sparked a desire in Lafortune to pursue the arts. Charlie, a world-renowned artist, inspired and encouraged Lafortune to pursue his artistic talents. Charlie’s knowledge of the Coast Salish art and cultural history provided a solid foundation for Lafortune’s approach to sculpture. He developed a unique and distinctive contemporary style based on classic Coast Salish design.

Others include Kathy Edgar from the Ditidaht with her cedar and grass woven baskets; clothing designer and fabric artists Charlene George of the T’ Sou-ke; Jeannette Gibbons with beadwork; and Jamin Zuroski with his innovative designs transferred to shhoes, tennis shoes and boots.

“They are very striking,” said Bristol of Zuroski’s work. “It’s a lot of fun for him.”

Drummaker Joan Glendale, knitter and weaver Iona Misheal will also show their handiwork. The folks from the Ladybug Greenhouse will offer handmade wreaths for sale.

The organizers for Tribal Journey 2012 will have a concession and all funds raised will go to this year’s journey. Folks attending can look forward to hot dogs earlier in the day and salmon and fresh baked bread later in the day.

“This year it seems the hall is full, we need a bigger space,” said Bristol. “It really makes us feel good that people want to see this and support it.”

The show runs from 10 a.m. to 6:30 p..m at the T’Sou-ke First Nation band hall at 2154 Lazzar Rd.

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