Playing roulette with our food

Dec. 12 Awareness film focuses on the seeds of deception

Playing roulette with our food.

When genetically engineered (GE) food first came on the scene, it was touted as the answer to world hunger.  But time has shown us that it has proven to be an untested toxic disaster, to humans, pets, livestock and lab rats that eat GE corn and soybeans and to the fields and farmers where they have been planted.

On Wednesday, Dec. 12 Awareness Film Night will present Genetic Roulette, a recently released film by Jeffrey Smith, one of the world’s leading experts on the health dangers of GE foods and author of Seeds Of Deception.

This film presents never before seen evidence that points to GE foods as a major contributor to rising disease rates, especially among children. Gastrointestinal disorders, allergies, inflammatory diseases, autism and infertility are just some of the problems implicated. It also provides meticulous research on how biotech companies continue to mislead legislators, the public and safety officials about the dangers of GE foods and offers practical suggestions for avoiding GE ingredients which can be hidden in our food.

John Robbins, author of  Diet For a New America has said about Genetic Roulette, “In exposing the bullying and deceit of the biotechnology industry, Jeffrey Smith’s mesmerizing film shines a bright light of hope that we can reclaim our health and our food systems.  Meticulously documented, thoroughly comprehensive and rivetingly presented, this is more than an adventure story with intense drama and high stakes.  It is, in fact, one of the most important stories ever told.  Watch it and be galvanized, inspired and engaged.”

As has been the tradition for the past few years, December’s Awareness Film Night will be a benefit for ICON (International Children’s Outreach Network), the small organization that long-time Sooke resident Eric Anderson (Hum) spends his month of January volunteering for in Africa. ICON’s work is to seek out and transport to treatment centres children who require life-altering surgeries for birth defects or accidents that have severely restricted or even endangered their lives, but whose parents do not have the means to send them for medical care.

Showtime is at 7 p.m. at the Edward Milne community school theatre. Admission is by donation.

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