Maestro Norman Nelson takes time to smell the roses.

Sooke Philharmonic celebrates 15 years

Beautiful music throughout the season

The Sooke Philharmonic Orchestra kicks off its fifteenth season… with two concerts at the end of October celebrating our young musicians. Nelson Moneo, winner of the 2011 Don Chrysler Concerto Competition, will play Sibelius’ Violin Concerto. The orchestra will also be joined by young string players from the School District 61 Festival Orchestra in Bizet’s Carmen Suite. The concert will be rounded out by Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7.

The Christmas concerts, will present highlights from Handel’s Messiah with the Sooke Philharmonic Chamber Players and the Sooke Philharmonic Chorus, as well as music for the festive season by Bach, Vaughan Williams and Leopold Mozart.

In February, the orchestra will be joined by internationally renowned soprano Nancy Argenta, singing operatic favourites by Handel and Mozart. Nancy hails from the Nelson area and now makes her home in Victoria. The program also features Mozart’s Paris Symphony (No. 31).

In March the Sooke Philharmonic Chorus and Chamber Players will present a concert version of Purcell’s opera Dido and Aeneas, conducted by Wade Noble. This all-Purcell evening will include the Chacony and two of his string Fantasias.

The June concert will pay tribute to the Canadian composer, Malcolm Forsyth, who died in July 2011, by performing Siyajabula! We Rejoice. This work was commissioned in 1994 as a season opener for the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, to celebrate the composer’s 60th birthday, and South Africa, Forsyth’s birth place. Also on the program is Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 3, played by young Victoria soloist Karnsiri Laothamatas. Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 4 will complete the program.

The October and June concerts take place in the Sooke Community Theatre and Alix Goolden Hall, and the Chamber Players concerts are in the Sooke Baptist Church and New St. Mary’s Church (Metchosin).

The season ends with the Philharmonic Fling, our annual free outdoor concert at Ed Macgregor Park in Sooke on July, 15 2012.

Performances will be at New St. Mary’s Church in Metchosin on Sunday, Dec. 4, Sunday Feb. 26 and Sunday April 1.

For more information, contact Sooke Philharmonic Society at:

www.sookephil.ca

(250) 642-2849

Email:  info@sookephil.ca.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Sooke Fall Fair postponed until 2021

Organizers hope to still hold some form of competitions

Cyclists see potential and pitfalls in Sooke infrastructure

Getting from Sooke Road to Galloping Goose Trail a challenge for bike riders

Province buys Paul’s Motor Inn to house Victoria’s homeless population

Inn is the second hotel the province has purchased to support vulnerable community

SEAPARC solidifies plans for Sooke summer camps

Facility set to reopen to the public

Firefighters called for technical rescue at Sooke Potholes

Woman breaks her leg while walking along riverbed

B.C. records four new COVID-19 cases, Abbotsford hospital outbreak cleared

Four senior home outbreaks also declared over, eight still active

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world in ways that would have… Continue reading

Friendly Cove and Kyuquot will remain closed until further notice

Transition of other B.C. communities will be monitored before a decision to ease restrictions

Gold River organizes a shop local initiative to creatively boost economy

Local purchases can earn shoppers $200 gift certificates to be spent on businesses within Gold River

Young killer whale untangles itself from trap line off Nanaimo shore

DFO marine mammal rescue unit arrived as whale broke free from prawn trap line

About 30% of B.C. students return to schools as in-class teaching restarts amid pandemic

Education minister noted that in-class instruction remains optional

Trudeau avoids questions about anti-racism protesters dispersed for Trump photo-op

Prime minister says racism is an issue Canadians must tackle at home, too

Most Read