Green Party leader Elizabeth May (centre) and North Island-Powell River Green candidate Mark de Bruijn (behind her) chat with supporters outside Campbell River’s Tidemark Theatre Thursday morning. Photo by Alistair Taylor/Campbell River Mirror

Green Party leader Elizabeth May (centre) and North Island-Powell River Green candidate Mark de Bruijn (behind her) chat with supporters outside Campbell River’s Tidemark Theatre Thursday morning. Photo by Alistair Taylor/Campbell River Mirror

Green Party leader Elizabeth May rolls through Vancouver Island to boost a party stronghold

Mocks media, evokes Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandela and promises change

Green Party leader Elizabeth May stopped into Campbell River Thursday morning to rally the party faithful as the federal election campaign rolled into its final weekend.

The North Island-Powell River (NIPR) visit is one of seven Vancouver Island stops she will be making over the next three days.

“Four days to go, we’re in the home stretch here,” NIPR Green candidate Mark deBruijn said when introducing May to a gathering of supporters in the lobby of the Tidemark Theatre, the local performing arts centre. The rally was originally scheduled for outside in Campbell River’s Spirit Square but less-than-ideal weather prompted a move indoors across the street.

“We’re starting what will be a tour through all seven Vancouver Island ridings before Saturday morning,” May told the crowd. “We’re going to get to all the places where the Greens are running strong, where we can elect Greens and where we will elect Greens in a Green wave to send more MPs to Ottawa who are committed to always putting principle ahead of power, putting hope and love and commitment ahead of short term partisan advantage.”

The last eight years in Ottawa in parliament have been a real struggle, May said.

“Because the culture of the place is so dispiriting,” she said. “And nothing will fix Parliament like a lot of beautiful new green MPs like Mark joining me there.”

May said the Green Party has been staying on the high road with a positive campaign. She mocked the media, pundits and her critics who dismissed the Green Party platform as being a Mission Impossible.

“What I’ve heard from so many journalists, critics and pundits is, ‘Well their plan’s awfully ambitious,’” May said. “And their strongest criticism of our plan is ‘It won’t be easy.’ It’s necessary and nothing worthwhile has ever been easy.

“Imagine if they’d said – not that I’m comparing myself to him – but what if they had said to Martin Luther King, ‘Boy, that’s ambitious.’ And, ‘It won’t be easy.’ Or, you know, to Nelson Mandela: ‘That’s ambitious. You’re going to end Apartheid? That won’t be easy.’

“Nothing worth doing in this world has ever been easy if it was worth doing. We have a status quo economy, we have a status quo culture that is prepared to celebrate greed over human well being, is prepared to say the billionaire class has a right to all the money they get because they’re the giant pooh-bahs of economic growth and nothing should get in their way and if climate change is a real issue, well, we’ll deal with it later. So our message is (youth climate activist) Greta’s (Thunberg) message which is there is no later, there’s only now and now is when Canadians have a referendum on climate and a chance to actually exercise our democratic right as citizens and vote for what we want.”

That list of what Canadians want, May said, includes universal, single-payer pharmacare; a universal early-learning child care plan; dental care; free post-secondary education and no student debt.

“We’re not just ambitious about climate change, we’re ambitious about social justice,” May said. “We’re very ambitious about the need to redress 150 years of colonialism and oppression and actually face the requirements for truth, justice and reconciliation.”

She disagreed that the fossil fuel industry is an engine of growth in the country, describing it, instead, as a sector calling us to join in a “funereal march to our own demise.”

And voters can restore the health of Mother Earth through such things as restoring wild salmon by removing “those horrific, toxic fish pens out of our waters,” she said.

‘We stand for life on this planet. It’s not too late,” May said.

RELATED: North Island candidates chime in on climate change, transition from fossil fuels

RELATED: Scheer, Trudeau, Singh haggle over potential minority government outcome


@AlstrT
editor@campbellrivermirror.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Sig
Highway 14 down to one-lane near Jordan River

Traffic on Highway 14, six kilometres east of Jordan River, is reduced… Continue reading

BC Hydro is reporting several outages in Sooke Monday morning. (BC Hydro/Facebook)
(Courtesy of West Shore RCMP)
Second driver facing impaired charges after View Royal traffic stop leads to loaded firearms

West Shore RCMP stop swerving motorist and Saanich woman who came to pick her up

Classes are cancelled at Royal Bay Secondary School and other schools Nov. 30 due to power outages. (Black Press Media file photo)
Classes cancelled across the West Shore, Sooke due to power outages

Students can be picked up but facilities remain open

Victoria police issued tickets to two Victoria party hosts Saturday night, according to VicPD Chief Del Manak. (Unsplash)
Victoria partiers hid in closets, bedrooms in an attempt to avoid fines

Police gave out COVID-19 tickets to two separate parties

A bus shelter in White Rock is emblazoned with an ad from B.C.’s Office of the Human Rights Commissioner on Sunday, Nov. 29, 2020. (Black Press Media files)
VIDEO: ‘Am I racist?’ campaign asks British Columbians to confront their unconscious biases

Signs asking British Columbians to think about racial injustice have been put up across the province

Black Press Media and BraveFace have come together to support children facing life-threatening conditions. Net proceeds from these washable, reusable, three-layer masks go to Make-A-Wish Foundation BC & Yukon.
Put on a BraveFace: Help make children’s wishes come true

Black Press Media, BraveFace host mask fundraiser for Make-A-Wish Foundation

Christy Jordan-Fenton is the co-author of the book Fatty Legs, which has been mentioned amid the controversy of an Abbotsford school assignment on residential schools.
Fatty Legs co-author responds to Abbotsford class assignment on residential schools

Children’s book mentioned amid controversy at W. A. Fraser Middle School

Kootenay East MLA Tom Shypitka takes over as energy and mines critic for the B.C. Liberal opposition. Kelowna-Lake Country MLA Norm Letnick (right) moves from health critic to assistant deputy speaker. (Hansard TV)
B.C. Liberals pick critics to take on Horgan’s NDP majority

Interim leader Shirley Bond takes seniors, long-term care

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance Chrystia Freeland listens to a question from a reporter on the phone during a news conference in Ottawa, Monday, Nov. 30, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Spending too little worse than spending too much, Freeland says as Canada’s deficit tops $381B

‘The risk of providing too little support now outweighs that of providing too much’

Left to right: A screenshot of NTC nurse navigator Lesley Cerney, FNHA regional mental health manager Georjeana Paterson and Island Health’s medical health officer Dr. Charmaine Enns addressing Ehattesaht community members from Ehatis reserve in a Facebook live update. (Ehattesaht First Nation/Facebook)
Medical team sent to Ehatis reserve near Zeballos to guide community through COVID outbreak

17 cases, eight recoveries and no hospitalizations as Island Health praises First Nation’s response

Still from a video surveillance camera of a man alleged to have stolen from several people at knife-point in Chilliwack (Rosedale) early on Nov. 28, 2020. (Facebook)
B.C. man defends his family against intruder, saves neighbour while wielding hockey stick

RCMP looking for footage that captures violent crime spree in Chilliwack

Harbour seals rest on log booms at Flavelle Mill in Port Hardy. With recent announcements the mill will be getting rid of the log booms, Dr. David Rosen sees an opportunity to study how the disappearance of this highly-frequented refuge for the seals will alter their behaviour in Burrard Inlet. (Photo supplied by David Rosen)
What the heck is going on with marine mamals in Vancouver waterways?

UBC researcher asks why they’re returning, and what role we’re playing

Christmas lights are something that people can do to celebrate the season that is not impacted by COVID-19. (File - Sooke News Mirror)
EDITORIAL: Holidays will be different this year

COVID-19 pandemic forces cancellation of many beloved Christmas events

Most Read