A spontaneous show & shine was held on August 1.

Drivers come our for show and shine

Fundraising for MS

  • Aug. 10, 2011 12:00 p.m.

It’s no surprise to see classic cars cruising the streets of Sooke on a beautiful day. And sometimes, if you’re lucky, you might see all of them gathered in one place like the impromptu show and shine that happened in front of A&W last Monday.

“They just phoned me and told me they were coming,” says Sooke A&W manager Heather Turner, who couldn’t recall the name of the car club.

About 20 cars were gathered around noon in the fast food chain parking lot, most with their hoods propped open, the midday sun bouncing off impossibly immaculate engines.

“We hope to get them out here every Sunday,” said Turner, who added the meet was “awesome.” A&W is trying to drum up support for their annual A&W Cruisin’ for a Cause Day on Aug. 25 happening at over 700 locations across Canada that supports finding a cure for Multiple Sclerosis (MS).

Everything from souped up American hotrods to rebuilt British convertibles filled the corner of the parking lot. Woody Wellwood, from Langford, brought out his ‘62 British racing green MG Midget.

“I’ve had it for 10 years, it’s been on the road for four and a half,” said Wellwood. “Every nut and bolt came off, it’s got parts off five cars.”

He said he’s been “playing with cars for 50 years,” and wasn’t affiliated with the unknown car club, but heard about the show and came to Sooke for the “nice drive out.”

What stood out from the car besides the attention to detail, like the red leather dash and polished chrome bumpers, was the passenger.

“His name is Rendar,” he said. Looking like replica of a Cabbage Patch doll, he and his wife rescued the toy from a garage sale that had on a baby bracelet spelling out the name. Dressed in overalls, Rendar has a pocket full of tools and plays the part of navigator and “running mate” on lonely drives.

A retired naval officer, Wellwood said the MG is actually a clone he built of another convertible he owned in 1962 that wasn’t properly cared for and met an untimely demise in 1969.

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