Tanya Bub’s sculpture of Takaya on Discovery Island. The five-foot tall driftwood wolf will be on display at the Empress Oct. 1 to 24. (Tanya Bub Photo)

Artist creates five-foot driftwood sculpture of Takaya

Ode to Discovery Island wolf will be displayed at Empress Hotel

For all of 2020’s extraordinary tales, the legend of the Discovery Island wolf known as Takaya is one that keeps growing.

After seven years living solo between the Songhees’ islands known as Tl’ches (Chatham and Discovery), the male coastal wolf came ashore in January and was captured in the James Bay neighbourhood.

Soon after his release into the wild of west Vancouver Island, he was shot by a hunter. It ended his life but only cemented his status as a modern legend of the West Coast. In May, artist Paul Archer captured Takaya in a wall mural on Broughton Street and then with an even bigger mural on an abandoned building on Discovery Island.

READ MORE: Beloved Discovery Island wolf Takaya shot and killed

Now Fairfield artist Tanya Bub has built a 150-pound, five-foot-tall driftwood sculpture of Takaya. The sculpture will be on display in The Empress Hotel lobby starting Oct. 1 and will then be part of the upcoming Takaya Lone Wolf Arts Festival in Nootka Court, Oct. 24.

“It started with COVID-19, when I started building more and more driftwood sculptures in my front yard,” said Bub, whose life-size stick man “Arthur Heart” has been on display in front of Gage Gallery on Oak Bay Avenue. “Two more became five which became 10 and once I got noticed it connected me with Cheryl Alexander.”

Alexander is the Ten Mile Point resident who frequented the shores of Tl’ches and captured more photos of Takaya than anyone. It’s because of Alexander’s passion for the wolf that Bub’s sculpture grew so big.

“It’s her sculpture,” Bub said. “It’s for her. I accompanied Cheryl to collect some driftwood from Discovery Island and spent a month to make the giant driftwood portrait.”

READ ALSO: Killing of Discovery Island wolf was legal says B.C. Conservation service

Bub careful detailed the sculpture to reflect the animal’s physical characteristics.

“If you look at the sculpture next to a picture of the real one you’ll see that it’s that particular wolf,” Bub said.

The goal, Bub said, is that the sculpture will continue touring art shows and be an ambassador for Takaya’s story.

A smaller Takaya will be part of Bub’s first solo art show coming up at the Gage Gallery in Oak Bay called Creatures Great and Small, Oct. 20 to Nov. 8.

It will feature an assortment of animals including a kid-friendly installation of a “miniature-world version of Dallas Road,” with “whales, boats, little tiny houses, angels, kayaks, and people walking dogs,” Bub said.

It will also have a smaller Takaya howling at the moon on Discovery while Alexander takes a photo.

Bub has also designed a “Communitree” to stand outside the Gage Gallery. It’s a bare tree about seven feet tall and five feet wide made of wire and free of leaves.

“It’s a tree that will be built by the community,” Bub said. “I’m inviting the public to make a leaf and drop it off so I can hang it on the tree.”

It’s a “reverse fall,” Bub said. As leaves fall off real trees, the Communitree will add leaves.

Some classes from Sir James Douglas elementary will make leaves for the tree and Bub is hoping for contributions from all parts of the community.

To contribute a paper leaf, cut it preferably in an oval shape about half the size of a piece of paper and deliver it to Gage Gallery, 2031 Oak Bay Ave., by Oct. 20. Bub will weatherproof the leaves and add them.

“Make an oval of a collage, words, a picture, a drawing, anything,” Bub said.

Also add a contact and Bub will be in touch to confirm the leaf has been hung.

reporter@oakbaynews.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Emily Harris (centre) started the in-person Monarch Moms meet-up groups in July, when it was much easier to physical distance in outdoor spaces. Harris started the group as a source of connection for women navigating the ups and downs of having a baby during a pandemic. (Nina Grossman/News Staff)
Victoria new mom group navigates challenges of motherhood in a pandemic

Monarch Moms meet once a week for physically-distanced connection

Royal Bay students are among the list of SD62 schools that will be trained by Pacific FC coaches and staff in a new soccer academy partnership. (Aaron Guillen/News Staff)
Pacific FC partners with Sooke School District soccer academies

Royal Bay, EMCS and Dunsmuir Middle students to receive professional training

Police closed McNeill Avenue after a workplace death Oct. 20, 2020. (Nina Grossman/News Staff)
Tree-pruning community gathers in Oak Bay after tragic death

Crews met in solidarity at site of Tuesday incident

Some 30 people including a dozen youth participated in North Saanich’s first ever Fridays for Future protest outside of municipal hall on Mills Road Friday, according to organizers. (Anne-Marie Daniel/Submitted)
Fridays for Future plans second event for North Saanich after inaugural protest

Some 30 people attended first protest on Oct. 9 with a second one scheduled for Oct. 23

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry presents modelling of COVID-19 spread in B.C., March 25, 2020. (B.C. government photo)
B.C. sets another COVID-19 record with 203 new cases

up to 1,766 active cases in B.C., two more deaths

Advance polls are open from Oct. 15 to 21 with election day on Oct. 24. (Black Press Media file photo)
RCMP. (Phil McLachlan - Black Press Media)
British Columbia man dies during ski trip near glacier west of Calgary

Kananaskis Public Safety and Alpine Helicopters responded around 2:30 p.m.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrives on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Monday, Oct. 19, 2020, following a week-long break for the House of Commons. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
One crisis after another for Trudeau since last federal election one year ago

It has been a year of unprecedented calamity and crisis

Members of the Sipekne’katik First Nation load lobster traps on the wharf in Saulnierville, N.S., after launching its own self-regulated fishery on Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan
Vancouver Island First Nations back Nova Scotia’s Indigenous lobster fishermen

Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council calls for action before lives are lost

Skiers line up to start the Royal LePage Comox Valley Snow to Surf Adventure Relay Race. Photo by Tim Penney
Popular Comox Valley adventure race cancelled for 2021

COVID forces Comox Valley Royal LePage Snow to Surf Adventure Relay Race cancellation again

Reader’s Lens
Richard Ashton took this picturesque scene from Whiffin Spit looking toward the Salty Towers dock and East Sooke. To submit a photo to Reader’s Lens, please email editor@sookenewsmirror.com. (Contributed photo)
Reader’s Lens

Reader’s Lens Richard Ashton took this picturesque scene from Whiffin Spit looking… Continue reading

Most Read