Bears are getting ready for winter and are seeking out food sources. They will not hesitate to enter yards and they have been spotted on Wright Road

Bears are getting ready for winter and are seeking out food sources. They will not hesitate to enter yards and they have been spotted on Wright Road

Bear Buzz – October 1

A word to the wise on keeping bear and human conflict to a minimum

Recent Wildlife Sightings:

 

Ella Road residents reported a black bear removing garbage from cans in the neighbourhood. The bear was taking the garbage into a neighbouring property.  A wooden box was built, in an attempt to store the garbage, but the bear broke open the box.

Store garbage in a secure building until collection day or consider purchasing a bear-resistant household container. If you cannot store garbage securely, freeze smelly items and add to the bin only on the morning of collection.

A black bear near Grant Road was in a tree eating apples. Apples left unpicked and ripening fruit left on the ground attracted the bear. The RCMP arrived, just as the animal was leaving the area.

A large black bear has been sighted in the Wright/McMillan/Francis Road areas.

A resident near Sooke River Road area, reported a black bear dragged a shed, full of garbage, across the yard. The garbage, left there for some time began to smell, was attracting the bear.

To change the behaviour of bears, we must first change our own. Be very diligent about not giving bears access to food, garbage, chickens, livestock, fruit trees, dog food, bird feeders, or any other type of attractant. If we take away the items that attract the bears, our communities will be a safer place for all of us.

This is an effective and proven, long-term solution for reducing human-bear conflicts.

Should you encounter a bear in your neighbourhood and it does not see you, simply walk away. If the bear sees you, speak to the bear in a low calm voice and slowly back away. Keep the bear in your field of vision but do not stare at the bear directly. Directly staring at a bear may be interpreted as a sign of aggression. Above all, never approach a wild animal. For more on what to do in the event of an encounter with wildlife or how to protect yourself visit  www.wildsafebc.com.

Remember, if you see any wildlife activity of concern, please call the 24-hour reporting line for the Conservation Officer Service: 1 -877-952-7277.