Former Nanaimo chief administrative officer Tracy Samra has filed a complaint with the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal against the City of Nanaimo and former mayor Bill McKay. (News Bulletin file)

Former chief administrative officer lodges human rights complaint against Nanaimo

City of Nanaimo, former mayor Bill McKay confirm complaint has been made

Nanaimo’s former chief administrative officer has launched a human rights complaint against the city and the former mayor.

Tracy Samra has filed a complaint with the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal against the City of Nanaimo and former mayor Bill McKay.

John Van Horne, the city’s director of human resources, confirmed with the News Bulletin that the city has received and been named in Samra’s tribunal complaint, but said he couldn’t discuss the nature of the complaint or comment further on the matter.

McKay said he received Samra’s tribunal complaint Thursday.

“I have not yet had a chance to meet with the city to review at this point,” McKay said in a message to the News Bulletin. “Further to that, as this is a personnel matter of the city’s, I am not at liberty to comment further.”

Current city councillor Sheryl Armstrong, asked if she was named in the human rights complaint, declined comment.

Samra was hired by the city in 2015 and fired earlier this year. She was arrested in late January for allegedly making threats and McKay, Armstrong and others have reasonable grounds to fear personal harm or injury due to an incident at city hall on Jan. 31, according to Nanaimo RCMP. As a result, the B.C. Prosecution Service is seeking to have Samra bound to conditions of a peace bond. A three-day hearing has been scheduled for March 27 in provincial court in Nanaimo.

READ ALSO: Peace bond hearing for former Nanaimo CAO pushed back

READ ALSO: Former CAO Samra was fired with cause, says councillor







nicholas.pescod@nanaimobulletin.com 
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