JdF candidates for director talk about the important issues

Alanda Carver and incumbent Mike Hicks talk about the two most important issues

  • Nov. 9, 2011 1:00 p.m.

Alanda Carver

I entered this election because I’m committed to democracy and to making our community better for everyone.  Although new to politics, I have a long history of community volunteering; working for community interests rather than special interests.  I’ve lived in the Electoral Area for 25 years, and have no personal stake in land development.  I am moderate, fair-minded, inclusive and accessible.

An important issue in this election is land use planning.  Good planning is a necessity for a safe, healthy community.  With the release of land from Tree Farm Licences, more land will come up for rezoning. Review of Official Community Plans and the pressure for increased development on previously forested lands mean that the community needs strong, balanced leadership.  In addition, many residents receive water from local water systems and wells. Good planning is what keeps your neighbour’s septic system a suitable distance from your water source.

Better local governance is directly related to broader community input. All members of a community deserve to be heard and respected. In the past three years, many of the local advisory committees have met infrequently. When elected, I will revitalize these committees so that citizens have a direct impact on decision making. I will also hold town hall meetings in each community to provide an informal setting to express local concerns and exchange ideas.

Electoral Area residents deserve to be represented by someone who will act in their best interest without bias. Decisions made by government impact us all. Electoral Area decisions are closest to home and have a direct impact on where we live, the water we drink, how we move, where we work and how we relax. These decisions are important, and every citizen’s voice should be heard. The time is right for change. Self-determination for our communities represents real change.

 

Mike Hicks

The two most important issues  in the Juan de Fuca revolve around governance and the land use decision making process. Although both are often related, they stand alone as to complexity and significance.

The Juan de Fuca Electoral area has a population roughly the same as Metchosin. It has two communities Otter Point and East Sooke each roughly the same population as the Highlands. Both the Highlands and Metchosin are municipalities and are represented by a Mayor and four councillors. They share the duties of attending meetings, making land use decisions, sitting on committees , working with their staff and generally running the business of their municipalities.

The lone JDF Regional Director, with help from his alternate, attend to all duties of the mayor and councils. In addition, he or she must convince the other CRD directors to endorse many of the decisions, must share staff with the rest of the CRD, and does not have a chief of staff or administrator. The seven distinct communities in the JDF deserve a more accountable governance system.

The Land Use Decision making process has been changed a few times and currently has a fragile system involving six elected volunteers. The system fails somewhat when a volunteer from Port Renfrew is making a decision on East Sooke or visa versa.

Governance can only be improved with a provincial governance study and land use decisions can be improved with strengthened OCPs. To that end, I have recently met with Minister Ida Chong to hopefully look at a possible governance study in the 2012 and I would again commit Gas Tax money to complete the Otter Point OCP review and start further reviews in East Sooke, Shirley/ Jordon River and Port Renfrew in 2012.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Black Press Media took to the streets of Colwood to find houses decorated for Halloween. (Aaron Guillen/News Staff)
PHOTOS: Check out these Colwood homes ready for Halloween

Halloween takes place on Saturday, Oct. 31

International Bat Week runs from Oct. 24 to 31. (Photo: Cory Olson)
Time to get batty for International Bat Week

International Bat Week runs from Oct. 24 to 31

Sooke Mayor Maja Tait was elected president of the Union of B.C. Municipalitiesin September 2019. She helped guide the 190-member organization through the coronavirus pandemic. (UBCM photo)
Sooke mayor front-line commander of the coronavirus pandemic

Maja Tait played pivotal role during COVID-19 crisis

HarbourCats players celebrate winning the North Division Championship Series in 2019. (Christian J. Stewart/File Photo)
Victoria HarbourCats locked out of team Facebook page

Management hires legal team to solve issue

Sooke School District No. 62 superintendent Scott Stinson explains that most block classes at Belmont Secondary will be halved. (Aaron Guillen/News Staff)
Sooke School District opens conversation on catchment boundary changes

Feedback solicited at virtual town hall Oct. 28

FILE – Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry provides the latest update on the COVID-19 pandemic in the province during a press conference in the press theatre at Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Thursday, October 22, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
B.C. shatters COVID-19 records with 817 weekend cases; masks now expected indoors

Three people have died over the past three reporting periods

RCMP have released more details regarding what led up to an arrest caught on video in Williams Lake Sunday, Oct. 26. (Facebook video screenshot)
Review launched after ‘high-risk, multi-jurisdictional’ chase, arrest in Williams Lake

RCMP launching a full review and code of conduct investigation

Freighter drags anchor towards Boulder Point Oct. 22. It came within 730 metres of the shore, according to maps from the Port of Nanaimo. (Photo submitted)
MacGregor introduces bill to address freighter anchorages along the South Coast

Concerns about the environment, noise, pollution and safety abundant

(Pxfuel)
B.C. limits events in private homes to household, plus ‘safe six’ amid COVID-19 surge

Henry issued a public health order limiting private gatherings to one household, plus a group of ‘safe six’ only

B.C. Liberal Leader Andrew Wilkinson speaks during a drive-in car rally campaign stop at a tour bus operator, in Delta, Saturday, Oct. 17, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Andrew Wilkinson stepping down as B.C. Liberal leader

Will stay on until the next party leader is chosen

Harvesters participating in the extended commercial halibut season will need to land their catch in either Prince Rupert (pictured), Vancouver, or Port Hardy by Dec. 14. (File photo)
B.C.’s commercial halibut season extended three weeks

COVID-19 market disruptions at the root of DFO’s decision

Campbell River's new hospital, July 2018
Nurse diverts opiates and falsifies records at Campbell River Hospital

Nurse facing disciplinary action for moving opiates out of the hospital

SIG
Sooke U15 squad blast past Comox

Rylan Sokolosky records hat trick

Most Read