Levee planned for New Year’s Day

Local woman continues centuries-old military tradition in Sooke

Times have changed and some things just are not done the same way they once were. For example, kings no longer receive male subjects in their bedchambers just after rising, and fur traders no longer pay their respects to the master of the fort on New Year’s Day.

The  first New Year’s levée in Canada was held in1646 by the governor of New France. The tradition was continued by British colonial governors, then by the governor general and the lieutenant governors. The military continued the historically male preserve until the Second World War when female officers were allowed to attend.

In 2013, the tradition continues in Sooke. The levée, organized by Brenda Parkinson, will be an opportunity for local citizens to meet with Mayor Wendal Milne and talk informally at the social gathering.

“I am a traditionalist,” stated Parkinson, “and it’s also a military tradition. Tradition is really good to have and I was pleased that Wendal wanted it right off the bat. It’s a start to the New Year on a good note.”

Speaking of notes, the Sooke Pipes and Drums and Janet McTavish will be providing the entertainment. The affair will feature the entertainment, a meet and greet and refreshments.

The refreshments will not be “traditional” though. It is a non-alcohol event. Tradition has it that under British colonial rule the wine in le sang du caribou was replaced with whisky (which travelled better). This was then mixed with goat’s milk and flavoured with nutmeg and cinnamon to produce an Anglicized version called “moose milk.”

Tuesday’s event runs from 10 a.m to 12 noon on Jan. 1.

 

“It’s a good time for people to come out and talk — not in a council way,” said Parkinson. “Come out and show your support. Kids are welcome, of course.”

 

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Wildfire smoke expected to blanket Greater Victoria again

Conditions expected to worsen Wednesday afternoon but not approach levels reached a few weeks ago

Former Victoria Royals manager celebrates Stanley Cup win

Grant Armstrong is now an amateur scout with Tampa Bay Lightning

Canadian warship HCMS Regina sails past Sidney

The vessel recently returned from the world’s largest naval exercise

Hundreds walk, bike, drive through Saanich’s full moon lantern festival

Harvest Moon celebration draws crowds for pandemic-friendly fun

‘Bonnie’ and ‘Henry’ among latest litter of service dog puppies

B.C. Alberta Guide Dogs names two pups after provincial health officer

105 new COVID-19 cases, 1 death as health officials urge B.C. to remember safety protocols

There are currently 1268 active cases, with 3,337 people under public health monitoring

Orange Shirt Society launches first textbook on residential school history

Phyllis Webstad and Joan Sorley worked on the 156-page book to help educate students

Orange Shirt Day lessons of past in today’s classrooms

Phyllis Webstad, who attended St. Joseph’s Mission Residential School in British Columbia, is credited for creating the movement

Greens’ Furstenau fires at NDP, Liberals on pandemic recovery, sales tax promise

She also criticized the NDP economic recovery plan, arguing it abandons the tourism industry

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

U.S. Presidential Debate Takeaways: An acrid tone from the opening minute

Here are key takeaways from the first of three scheduled presidential debates before Election Day on Nov. 3

B.C. nurses report rise in depression, anxiety, exhaustion due to pandemic

A new UBC study looks into how the COVID-19 response has impacted frontline nurses

National child-care plan could help Canada rebound from COVID-induced economic crisis: prof

A $2 billion investment this year could help parents during second wave of pandemic

Most Read