Looking Back December 3, 2014

A brief look at what made the news in Sooke in years gone by

  • Dec. 3, 2014 7:00 p.m.

In 2010 the Sooke Philharmonic Orchestra sold promotional scarves.

December 2, 1969

Douglas queries possible oil pollution

Tommy Douglas, leader of the NDP and MP for Nanaimo-Cowichan-Islands, attempted last week to have the issue of potential oil pollution arising from the proposed exploratory debated in the House of Commons.

His motion for the debate arose, he said, “out of the fact that the government of British Columbia has granted seismic testing permits for drilling in the coastal areas of B.C., in particular Georgia Strait.

“The people in those areas are fearful that they will be subjected to the same kind of oil pollution which has been experienced by people living in the coastal areas of California. If the seismic tests prove to be favourable the oil companies will be applying to the federal government for oil drilling permits.”

December 5, 1979

Spring salmon making a comeback in Sooke River

Spring salmon are making a comeback in the Sooke River.  Last year they seemed to be facing extinction, with only six of them seen, but this year fisheries officer John Stephen estimates a run of 50.

This year’s return of DeMamiel Creek coho are also good and fisheries officer Denis Burnip credits this in part to the Sooke Conservation Society’s salmon enhancement program.

In general, however, Stephen describes Sooke area runs over the last few years as “depressed, nothing to what they were in the past.”

December 6, 1989

Blue boxes coming to Sooke this week

The Blue box collection for recyclable materials in Sooke was officially inaugurated on Saturday.

The ceremony, originally scheduled to take place in front of the Evergreen Shopping Centre, had to be moved inside to the Community Hall because of heavy rain.

December 1, 1999

New Milnes Landing store expected to rise from ashes of former building

A new Milnes Landing Store is expected to rise from the ashes of the former landmark building destroyed by a fire last July.

Property owner Dennis Tottenham has received approval from the Capital Regional District to build a new convenience store on the property next to Fred Milne Park.

Money from fire insurance will cover the cost to rebuild the store which will take on the same configuration as the previous building.

However, Tottenham said he won’t be operating the new store.

“It’ll go to the person who buys it.”

Tottenham said he had tempting offers by franchises like Tim Hortons, for the property, but he decided not to go that route.

“I didn’t want that.  It wouldn’t reflect the community.  It would be a corporation. You’ve got to look after history,” he said.

December 2, 2009

Preservation groups alarmed by clear cut

The Muir Creek Protection Society is one component of a joint media event held last Monday at the Best Western Hotel in Victoria.

The publicity effort was held in concert with the Wilderness Committee and the Sierra Club of B.C. and the main point made was the urgent nature of establishing regional park status for the Muir Creek Watershed.

The area is said to be home to “the most magnificent stand of old-growth forest on private land near Victoria and the CRD.”

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Wildfire smoke expected to blanket Greater Victoria again

Conditions expected to worsen Wednesday afternoon but not approach levels reached a few weeks ago

Former Victoria Royals manager celebrates Stanley Cup win

Grant Armstrong is now an amateur scout with Tampa Bay Lightning

Canadian warship HCMS Regina sails past Sidney

The vessel recently returned from the world’s largest naval exercise

Hundreds walk, bike, drive through Saanich’s full moon lantern festival

Harvest Moon celebration draws crowds for pandemic-friendly fun

‘Bonnie’ and ‘Henry’ among latest litter of service dog puppies

B.C. Alberta Guide Dogs names two pups after provincial health officer

105 new COVID-19 cases, 1 death as health officials urge B.C. to remember safety protocols

There are currently 1268 active cases, with 3,337 people under public health monitoring

Orange Shirt Day lessons of past in today’s classrooms

Phyllis Webstad, who attended St. Joseph’s Mission Residential School in British Columbia, is credited for creating the movement

Greens’ Furstenau fires at NDP, Liberals on pandemic recovery, sales tax promise

She also criticized the NDP economic recovery plan, arguing it abandons the tourism industry

U.S. Presidential Debate Takeaways: An acrid tone from the opening minute

Here are key takeaways from the first of three scheduled presidential debates before Election Day on Nov. 3

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

B.C. nurses report rise in depression, anxiety, exhaustion due to pandemic

A new UBC study looks into how the COVID-19 response has impacted frontline nurses

National child-care plan could help Canada rebound from COVID-induced economic crisis: prof

A $2 billion investment this year could help parents during second wave of pandemic

Search suspended for Indigenous elder last seen mushroom picking in northwest B.C.

Mushroom picker Thomas (Tommy) Dennis has been missing since Sept. 16

Most Read