The movers and shaker who made the Sunriver Gardens happen back in 2010.

The movers and shaker who made the Sunriver Gardens happen back in 2010.

Looking Back – March 26, 2014

A look back at what made the news in the Sooke area in years past

  • Mar. 26, 2014 8:00 a.m.

A look back at what made the news in years past.

 

March 18, 2009

Basi headed to court

David Basi, the former ministerial aide to former finance minister Gary Collins, will be making his first B.C. Supreme Court appearance on April 1.

He was committed to trial on March 11. Basi is charged with breach of trust in connection with the removal of Sunriver Estates lands from the Agricultural Land Reserve. The Sunriver property is owned by Shambrook Hills Development Corp. and encompasses 155 hectares of land.

In July, 2008, Sunriver builders Anthony Ralph Young and James Seymour Duncan were ordered to stand trail for breach of trust and bribery. The Crown is alleging Young and Duncan paid Basi $50,000 in attempts to remove the lands from the ALR. The charges followed a December 2003 raid on the B.C. Legislature  prompted by a drug probe.

Basi is currently in pre-trial proceeding for breach of trust in connection to the BC Rail sale process for allegedly leaking confidential information to a U.S.-based rail company.

The whole “railgate” affair led to suspensions and resignations, including Deputy Premier Christ Clark.

March 17, 2004

No brakes put on school bus fees

School bus fees are here to stay.

And within a couple of weeks, parents will receive a letter asking them to make a reservation so their child can ride the bus for the next school year.

Parents will be required to make a deposit for next year to ensure their children get a seat. By knowing in advance how many students will be on school district buses, the district will be able to plan routes accordingly.

Currently, parents pay $12 per month for the first school bus patron, $20 per month for two children, three for $25 and four children cost $30. Kindergarteners pay $6 per month. A $300 per year maximum was set.

March 17, 1999

Harbour House joins farmed fish boycott

The Sooke Harbour House was one of four restaurants announcing Thursday they were joining a boycott of farmed salmon being organized by the Western Canada Wilderness Committee and the Raincoast Conservation Society.

“We’re committed to serving our customers the best seasonal, regional, organic and whole foods available from Vancouver Island,” owner Sinclair Philip said in a press release. “Without question, the best tasting and healthiest salmon by far is wild salmon.”

Sooke Harbour House was joined by Spinnakers Brewpub, Re-bar, and The Tapa Bar in declaring they will not serve farmed salmon.

March 16, 1994

Proposed store clears first hurdle

The CRD approved in principle Wednesday a rezoning application that could allow the construction of a general store in East Sooke.

Official approval will be granted if regional director Bob Clark and other voting directors support the proposal after listening to community input at an upcoming public hearing.

Applicant Bill Smith wasn’t jumping for joy at the news, however. Rezoning approval is just one of several hoops he will have to leap through before a store becomes a reality.

He will also need a CRD development permit and meet guidelines set by the Ministry of Environment and the Ministry of Highways.

March 11, 1987

MLA ‘reasonably certain’ road will be improved

MLA Moe Sihota says he is “reasonably certain” that the provincial ministry of highways will allocate funds for the improvement of Sooke Road this year.

Mr. Sihota said the Transportation minister Cliff Michael is very much aware “that there is an intensive lobby on the part of many people” to have the road improved.

The MLA said he anticipated that the road improvements would consist of straightening out some curves, and adding passing lanes and pull-outs so that slower drivers could pull over to allow others to pass.

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