More work to be done on Nott’s Creek development

The issue of narrower roads through a proposed subdivision along Otter Point Road took up most of the evening at the regular council meeting on January 10.

The issue of narrower roads through a proposed subdivision along Otter Point Road took up most of the evening at the regular council meeting on January 10.

The developer, Canadian Horizons Land Investment Corp. was looking for a variance to build six metre roads throughout the 133 lot subdivision. The standard is 12m. This didn’t sit well with anyone in the council chambers, including neighbouring property owners.

The developer stated that six metre roads were commonplace in many subdivisions and created a community within a community.

He said, “the six metre pavement is important for the development and no sidewalks is an integral part of our master plan.”

The property, which was part of the old John Phillips Memorial Golf Course, has a tainted history in Sooke. People were upset when the golf course was sold resulting in a thumbs down for a connector road. That connector road is now part of the district’s plans although the district “forgot” to secure access through the Nott’s Creek property.

Building the connector will mean having to realign Otter Point Road and that is where one neighbour is protesting the subdivision plans. The Townsend Road resident said the realignment would mean Otter Point Road was next to her back fence.

“It totally ruins the enjoyment of my property,” said Liza Dawson-Whisker.

Also at stake is the zoning on the property which is now RM4. The developer wants to rezone back to RS3.

“Otter Point will reconfigure no matter what zoning the property has,” said Councillor Herb Haldane. “We need that piece of property.”

Other councillors stated that the development itself looked a “little crowded,” and there were issues of safety and speeding.

In the end council passed the recommendation that the developer continue to work with staff on the road width issue.

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