NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg speaks during a media conference at NATO headquarters in Brussels, Friday, July 5, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Virginia Mayo

NATO secretary general meets Trudeau in Canada, amid Russia, U.S.-Iran tensions

Trump has called the organization an outdated body

The secretary-general of NATO has arrived in Canada for a meeting with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Jens Stoltenberg will tour Canadian Forces Base Petawawa with Trudeau and discuss Canada’s NATO deployments in Latvia and Iraq with him.

Trudeau will also address Canadian troops at this base, about 160 kilometres west of Ottawa.

NATO is part of the rules-based international order the Liberal government frequently promotes, and one of the many multilateral organizations that U.S. President Donald Trump has criticized.

Trump has called the organization an outdated body, saying it was formed to defend the West in the Cold War but is neglected and underfunded by its own members, leaving the U.S. to assume the burden of supporting it.

Canada’s mission in Latvia is one of several in NATO countries that have borders with Russia, part of a show of force to discourage Russian President Vladimir Putin from threatening other countries in Europe’s east.

The increased NATO presence is a result of Russia’s 2014 annexation of Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula, and its fomenting of Kremlin-backed Russian separatists in Ukraine’s eastern regions. Ukraine is not a NATO member.

Canada also leads the NATO training mission for Iraqi forces in that country. There are heightened tensions in that region because of the escalating dispute between the U.S. and neighbouring Iran.

After the visit to CFB Petawawa, Stoltenberg will travel to Toronto for a speech and question-and-answer session at the University of Toronto.

The visit starts a week of transatlantic diplomacy for Trudeau, who will welcome European Union leaders to a summit in Montreal on Wednesday.

ALSO READ: Trudeau stresses balancing economy, environment during brief Stampede visit

ALSO READ: Go back to your ‘broken and crime infested’ homes, Trump tells congresswomen of colour

The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

320 years since the ‘Big One’ doesn’t mean it’s overdue: Canada Research Chair

‘It could happen today, tomorrow or 100 years from now’

Police seek ID of man who stole from store, pulled knife on owner and fled scene on bike

Oak Bay police are asking for help identifying the suspect

Oak Bay police searching for missing man

Nicholas Hasanen has not been seen in a couple of weeks, is known to sleep in local parks

New Stats Canada survey confirms cash value of master’s degree

Holders of master’s degrees earn up to $21,000 more than undergraduate degree holders

Mainly cloudy skies ahead for Monday

Plus a look ahead at the week’s forecast

VIDEO: SNL skewers Trudeau’s mockery of Trump in high school cafeteria sketch

The three world leaders won’t let Trump sit at the cool kids’ table

Wealth of Canadians divided along racial lines, says report on income inequality

One interesting finding was that racialized men have a higher employment rate than non-racialized men

B.C. universities post $340 million worth of surpluses thanks to international student tuition

Students call for spending as international enrolment produces huge surpluses at many universities

Conservatives urge Morneau to deliver ‘urgent’ fall economic update

Morneau says the first thing the Liberals plan to do is bring in their promised tax cut for the middle class

INFOGRAPHIC: How much money did your local university or college make last year?

B.C. university and colleges posted a combined $340 million surplus in 2018/19

B.C. creates $8.5M organization to improve safety for health care workers

Group will bring together unions, province, health care organizations

Kovrig clings to humour as ‘two Michaels’ near one year in Chinese prison

Their detention is widely viewed as retaliation for Canada’s arrest of Chinese high-tech scion Meng Wanzhou

Brain injury from domestic abuse a ‘public health crisis,’ says B.C. researcher

Nearly 80% of the domestic violence victims who reported to police last year were women

Most Read