Police kept busy with numerous drug busts

Sooke RCMP have had a busy month busting marijuana grow operations throughout the district. Eight residents of Sooke will be standing before the judge in the near future.

This house on Grant Road was the scene of a marijuana grow op bust on January 17.

Sooke RCMP have had a busy month busting marijuana grow operations throughout the district. Eight residents of Sooke will be standing before the judge in the near future.

Three adults are in custody after Sooke RCMP executed a search warrant on a residential home in the 6700 block of Grant Road and discovered a large marijuana grow operation. The early morning bust took place on Thursday, Jan. 17. Two males and a female have been charged with cultivation of a controlled substance.

Staff Sergeant Steven Wright of the Sooke RCMP said they had been working on that situation for awhile. The police found 300 marijuana plants in the basement as well as other marijuana throughout the house.

Wright credited the Sooke Fire Department for supplying them with a generator to provide electricity and lights for the search as the hydro was cut off.

“It was a dangerous situation for us,” said Wright.

On Tuesday, Jan. 25 Sooke RCMP executed a search warrant on a house in the 2000 block of Otter Point Road. They seized a substantial amount of marijuana, hash oil, mushrooms and cash. The house was well-known to police and neighbours.

Arrested and charged with possession for the purpose of trafficking were two females aged 56 and 37. Their first court appear is scheduled for March 24, 2011.

A well-known drug house in the 2200 block of Stone Creek Place was the scene of another bust on Jan. 6. Police executed a search warrant and arrested three Sooke residents. They are charged with possession for the purpose of trafficking and trafficking in a controlled substance. The three are all adults, a 69-year-old male and two 45-year-old females. They are scheduled to make their first court appearance on March 17, 2011.

RCMP dismantled at least 10 grow ops in the past year. They welcome any information received from the public. Grow ops are particularly dangerous given the fact that they are ususally wired very dangerously and the risk of fire is great. These homes are unhealthy for children due to the poor air quality as well.

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