Innovation, Science and Economic Development Minister Navdeep Bains announces ‘supercluster’ funding in Ottawa, Feb. 15, 2018. (Government of Canada).

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Minister Navdeep Bains announces ‘supercluster’ funding in Ottawa, Feb. 15, 2018. (Government of Canada).

Tech consortium invests $25 million into 14 research projects, two at UVic

Investments come with goal of developing, implement technologies created by Canadians

The Digital Technology Supercluster, an industry-led consortium aiming to position Canada as a global leader in digital technologies, invested $25 million in 14 projects, including two at the University of Victoria.

The Supercluster co-invests with companies, academic institutions and not-for-profit organizations to develop and implement digital technologies created by Canadian companies.

One of the projects at UVic that will get a portion of the funding is Fresh Water Data Commons, which focuses on developing a platform integrating various sources of data to better understand ecosystem health, specifically of major water systems such as the Columbia Basin, which will help inform water use, conservation and management. The project has been called ‘CSI for wildlife’ by the biologist involved.

READ ALSO: ‘CSI for wildlife’: eDNA detects endangered frog near Lillooet

Another project to get some of the funding is the nine month Women’s Entrepreneurship Program, which will build capacity for entrepreneurs and their tech ventures through boot camps, workshops, mentorship and peer-sharing on leadership skills.

The Dermatology Point-of-Care Intelligent Network, which uses artificial intelligence-powered medical imaging to allow patients to get diagnosed in — rather than months — for skin cancer anywhere in Canada received funding from the Supercluster previously.

READ ALSO: Latest Victoria economic plan features new conference centre, downtown tech transformations

Earth Data Store, another project that benefited from previous funding, will collect, standardize and secure date from multiple sources such as earth observation satellite imagery and environmental sensors for predictive purposes. This technology will improve the analysis of climate change and the coordination of emergency response in extreme events.

EDITORS NOTE: A previous version of this story stated an inaccurate number of projects to be funded, the story has been corrected.



kendra.crighton@blackpress.ca

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University of Victoria