There were plenty of loonies spent to get a referendum Yes vote

COLUMN: Every ‘Yes’ vote cost local taxpayers $22.49

The cost to hold the referendum was $22,000 and just 9.6 per cent of 12,307 eligible voters cast a ballot.

A corrected version of this column is below:

 

Wednesday morning musings and meditations.

•••

If you think taxpayers got dinged in the recent SEAPARC land purchase referendum, you may not want to read this.

The cost to hold the referendum was $22,000 and just 9.6 per cent of 12,307 eligible voters cast a ballot.

If you break down the expenses, each Yes vote cost you $22.49.

And there’s still the issue that the land purchase won’t cost taxpayers a dime. That’s sort of correct.

SEAPARC will make the payments from its existing pool requisition, which was retired last year, but taxpayers never got that money back.

So what’s the first thing a politician wants to do? Keep the money and push it into another program, of course.

Juan de Fuca Electoral Area director Mike Hicks said SEAPARC never needed to hold the referendum and could have paid for the property outright, but decided instead to “let the people” decide if that’s what they wanted.

Obviously, we voted with our wallets.

•••

We live in one of the most beautiful spots of the world, yet we don’t treat it kindly.

You have to laud the efforts of people like Shirley’s Jan and Meg Toom, who got tired of finding illegal dumps along trailways and wooded areas and set out a plan to clean up the mess left by others. In one day, the Tooms and other volunteers collected more than 5.5 tons of garbage.

It makes you understand then why some Capital Regional District directors are so reluctant to open up the Leech River watershed to full public access.

The political jargon reads that they want to keep the water pure and safe from fire. (It is estimated that water from the Leech River watershed will be needed to supplement the water in the Sooke Lake Reservoir sometime in the next 50 years).

The cold, hard reality is that we don’t treat our natural spaces very well.

Take a trip to any wilderness area and you will find human mess. It can be as small as a cigarette butt or as large as an old truck.

I’ve trekked through most of the provincial and regional parks in Greater Victoria and always amazed what I find in the deep wilderness.

Once, we came across an old car about 1940s’ vintage. Over towards Mount Work there is a trail fondly called Bubble Wrap trail for the amount of garbage found on it.

It’s nice for all of us to call this the greatest place to live in the world, but we should all make a big effort to at least keep it clean.

•••

Kevin Laird can be reached at editor@sookenewsmirror.com.

 

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Rock painting gains popularity on Vancouver Island

Facebook groups formed for people to share ideas, gift painted rocks

VIDEO: View Royal resident spots cougar in nearby backyard

B.C. Conservation notified about early Thursday morning sighting

Greater Victoria tourism industry ‘can’t wait any longer’ for financial aid

Saanich mayor, business owners call on provincial, federal governments for tourism-specific aid

COVID-19 demolishes new construction in Greater Victoria

Value of new building permits in Greater Victoria drop more than 37 per cent

Group desperate to find solution to wrecks lining shores of Cadboro Bay

Caddy Bay ‘a wild west’ without authority, say locals

22 new COVID-19 test-positives, one death following days of low case counts in B.C.

Health officials urged British Columbians to ‘stand together while staying apart’

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world in ways that would have… Continue reading

Man found dead in his tent at Island homeless camp

Facebook posts tell of personal struggles and attempts to stay clean and sober

New study is first full list of species that only exist in Canada

Almost 40 per cent of them are critically imperilled or imperilled and eight are already extinct

Federal aid for care home systems needed ahead of second wave, advocates say

Ontario Long Term Care Association calling for more action

B.C. woman, 26, fatally shot by police in Edmundston, N.B.

Police were conducting a well-being check at the time of the incident

Horgan calls for national anti-racism program; will pitch idea to PM, premiers

Premier John Horgan said he’s horrified by the death of George Floyd in the United States

Chilliwack dad rescues two young daughters after truck plunges into lake

“I used every single one of my angels that day,” said Dennis Saulnier

Most Read