EDITORIAL: Your vote crucial to nation’s future

We say: The best thing you can do on election day is vote intelligently on the issues and candidates

On Monday, we vote across the nation to elect a new federal government.

Media coverage of the election was vigorous and extensive. There appears to be a real recognition of the importance to this vote. This is heartening.

Our increased interest is timely, because the federal government will face big challenges in the next four years, and not just on the economy.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership will create a free-trade zone among 12 nations around the Pacific, making it the world’s largest. The countries within its scope account for 40 per cent of the world’s economic output.

The economy continues to struggle. Whether you believe Canada is in a recession or not, the new federal government needs to come with a fresh approach to creating jobs and economic stability over the long-term.

Canada also faces key debates over transportation, jobs, transit, infrastructure, immigration and health care, just to name a few.

Then there is the little matter of climate change. Canadians already rank climate and environment as a top issue both during and between election cycles.

And with international climate talks scheduled in Paris for late November, Canadians have a real opportunity for their votes to translate into substantial climate action on the global stage.

Pressure is mounting for Canada to play a leadership role at these negotiations, with major trading partners like China and the U.S. announcing their emission reduction goals and commitments.

The choices we make are critical to our future. We trust that citizens across Canda will turn out in numbers that do credit to our electoral process and honour the efforts of all candidates in the often gruelling campaigns.

The best thing we can do is to intelligently vote for them.

 

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