Greenpeace protester Benjamin Zielinski sits chained to fence at Trans Mountain pipeline's Burnaby oil terminal

Greenpeace protester Benjamin Zielinski sits chained to fence at Trans Mountain pipeline's Burnaby oil terminal

Green machine gathers in B.C.

'It's an industry now, and as with our automotive industry, Canada is a branch plant of the U.S.'

VICTORIA – Canada’s sleek, imported green propaganda machine rolled into the capital last week for a couple of days of meetings.

You wouldn’t have heard about it, because they didn’t stage any protests or press conferences. Instead they met quietly with selected reporters as well as politicians from both sides of the aisle. They didn’t invite me for some reason, but from what I can gather, it was a friendly networking session.

When I speak of our U.S.-directed environmental movement, many people still don’t know what I mean. They see the sign-waving on TV and assume it’s all spontaneous, driven by passionate volunteers. Nuke the Whales for Jesus, as we used to joke in the 1970s.

It’s an industry now, and as with our automotive industry, Canada is a branch plant of the U.S.

The Victoria event was an annual conference called Organizing for Change, sponsored by Tides Canada. Thanks mainly to the work of B.C. researcher Vivian Krause, this offshoot of the U.S. Tides Foundation now at least identifies itself while it pulls B.C.’s political strings.

Organizing for Change currently includes Ecojustice, Greenpeace, Sierra Club B.C., ForestEthics Advocacy, ForestEthics Solutions, Georgia Strait Alliance, Dogwood Initiative, Pembina Institute, West Coast Environmental Law, Wildsight and Seattle-based Conservation Northwest.

Tides is itself a front for wealthy charitable foundations based mostly in Seattle and California, funded by billionaires who see “saving” B.C. as their personal eco-project.

Their hired activists met with Environment Minister Mary Polak to discuss her just-introduced Water Sustainability Act. This was to demand heavy fees and choking regulations on water used for “fracking,” that nefarious gas drilling technology so demonized in fake documentaries and celebrity protests.

Tides no longer attempts to hide its strategy of targeting energy development in B.C. and Alberta. Its tactics are well known, too. Environmentalists need high-profile wins, and the economic pain is best inflicted outside of the U.S., the biggest polluter in world history.

Organizing for Change’s stated priorities for the year are the “last stand of the Great Bear Rainforest,” the “Sacred Headwaters” and the Water Sustainability Act.

Professional protesters are mainly just taking credit for the 2012 buy-back of Shell’s coalbed gas licences around the headwaters of the Nass, Skeena and Stikine Rivers. Tahltan Central Council declared that territory theirs in 1910, and having pros roll in with slogans and graphics wasn’t exactly crucial to the outcome.

Their greatest marketing success so far is the Great Bear Rainforest, which is continually portrayed as being in peril from hunting, logging and of course, oil and gas development.

One of the documents Krause unearthed is a 2008 plan entitled “Tar Sands Campaign Strategy 2.1” that has proven remarkably prophetic. As Greenpeace, Sierra and ForestEthics were negotiating the 2007 Great Bear land use plan, other network members were preparing to “raise the negatives” and market Alberta as a unique threat to planetary integrity.

I’ve written before about the distortions and evasions required to present such a fossil fuel fairy tale. Suffice it to say that while we have busloads of protesters in B.C., you don’t see them in those benevolent petro-states Angola, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Saudi Arabia, Nigeria, Venezuela, Kuwait or Algeria. They’re not saving the whole planet, just the safe and lucrative parts.

And as I mentioned after the protester-staged Neil Young concert tour, it’s amazing how American oil and gas interests and Alaska oil tankers remain invisible to this sophisticated network.

NDP environment critic Spencer Chandra Herbert met with the green machine too. He wants all of B.C.’s groundwater mapped and measured deep into the Earth’s crust. That should take a while.

Tom Fletcher is legislature reporter and columnist for Black Press.

Follow me on Twitter: @tomfletcherbc

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

West Shore RCMP is asking for the public’s help in locating Mackenzie Courchene, a Langford teenager.
MISSING: Mackenzie Courchene last seen in Langford on March 2

West Shore RCMP is asking for the public’s help in locating the Langford teenager

Rendering of the proposed Esquimalt public safety building. (Courtesy Township of Esquimalt)
Esquimalt blazes new trail toward modern public safety building

Township using alternative approval process for first time to gauge public support for proposal

Landmarks such as Howard the giant gnome at Galey's Farm in Saanich make a stunning backdrop for celebratory dance in the Greater Victoria Festival Society trailer for its coming Dance Victoria campaign. (Screeshot/Greater Victoria Festival Society)
Residents’ videos help campaign Dance Across Victoria

Celebratory dance clips to be compiled into Greater Victoria Festival Society video

Reynolds Secondary School’s spring musical Freaky Friday features Grace Fouracre as teen Ellie Blake (left) who swaps bodies with her overworked mother, Katherine, played by Nadia Lurie. (Photo courtesy Reynolds Secondary School)
Saanich high school goes virtual with Freaky Friday musical

Reynolds Secondary theatre program to livestream performances March 9-12

Saanich Fire Department. Black Press Media File Photo
Fire displaces three Saanich families from two homes

Saanich firefighters found the fire had spread to a neighbouring home upon arriving

Elvira D’Angelo, 92, waits to receive her COVID-19 vaccination shot at a clinic in Montreal, Sunday, March 7, 2021, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
‘It’s been a good week’: Tam hopeful on vaccines as pandemic anniversary nears

Tam says the addition of two new vaccines will help Canadians get immunized faster

Const. Allan Young. Photo: Abbotsford Police Department
Manslaughter charge laid in Nelson death of Abbotsford police officer

Allan Young died after an incident in downtown Nelson last summer

(The Canadian Press)
‘Worse than Sept. 11, SARS and financial crisis combined’: Tourism industry in crisis

Travel services saw the biggest drop in active businesses with 31 per cent fewer firms operating

The Port Alice pulp mill has been dormant since 2015. (North Island Gazette file photo)
Parts recycled, life returning to inlet as as old Port Alice mill decommissioned

Bankruptcy company oversees de-risking the site, water treatment and environmental monitoring

The Conservation Officers Service is warning aquarium users after invasive and potentially destructive mussels were found in moss balls from a pet store. (BC Conservation Officers Service/Facebook)
Aquarium users in B.C. warned after invasive mussels found at pet store

Conservation officers were told the mussels were found in a moss ball from a Terrace pet store.

Hockey hall-of-fame legend Wayne Gretzky, right, watches the casket of his father, Walter Gretzky, as it is carried from the church during a funeral service in Brantford, Ont., Saturday, March 6, 2021. HE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Walter Gretzky remembered as a man with a ‘heart of gold’ at funeral

The famous hockey father died Thursday at age 82 after battling Parkinson’s disease

Donald Alan Sweet was once an all star CFL kicker who played for the Montreal Alouettes and Montreal Concordes over a 13-year career. Photo courtesy of Mission RCMP.
Ex-B.C. teacher who was CFL kicker charged with assault, sexual crimes against former students

Donald Sweet taught in Mission School District for 10 years, investigators seek further witnesses

(Black Press Media files)
Medicine gardens help Victoria’s Indigenous kids in care stay culturally connected

Traditional plants brought to the homes of Indigenous kids amid the COVID-19 pandemic

Most Read