Letters: Adhere to procedures

District of Sooke council should follow their own procedures

Open letter to council:

On Feb. 10, at the opening of the council meeting some folks were told, by a highly experienced councillor as he presented himself, that they could speak during public question and comment period.

This is always announced for folks to come forward to speak on anything in the agenda package, the reason being, that the public may have more information to impart to council prior to their decisions made during council meeting. This is only for items on the agenda as council members may not be familiar or have information on a subject brought forward not on the agenda.

The time to bring forward something, not on the agenda, is at the end of the meeting so if council considers that it needs further information or if they want to pursue an issue, they  can ask staff for further information so that they may be informed.

There is also an opportunity for a group or one person to contact the corporate secretary to be a delegation and bring forward an issue, which again, council will decide if they want further information and if they want to pursue the issue.

The public question and answer period is limited to two minutes each to a total of 10 minutes. I understand that there was approx. 45 minutes taken up in this time by a group which should have been a delegation, limited to five minutes, after approval from the corporate secretary or they  could have spoken after the meeting.

These are council’s own procedures and should be adhered to, a seasoned politician,should not be giving wrong advice to citizens and wasting staff and council time.

All council should be aware of these procedures and called a point of order. Respectfully,

Ellen Lewers

Sooke

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Sooke seeks feedback on new building regulation bylaw

In addition to the online survey, a virtual online meeting takes place Oct. 22

Employees at Sooke business recognize Orange Shirt Day

Event remembers Indigenous children sent to residential schools

B.C. Greens introduce all-women slate for Victoria, Saanich and Oak Bay ridings

School trustee Nicole Duncan assumes Oak Bay-Gordon Head candidacy

Wildfire smoke expected to blanket Greater Victoria again

Conditions expected to worsen Wednesday afternoon but not approach levels reached a few weeks ago

Orange Shirt Society launches first textbook on residential school history

Phyllis Webstad and Joan Sorley worked on the 156-page book to help educate students

U.S. boater fined $1,000 for violation of Quarantine Act

49-year-old man entered Canada to visit girlfriend in Surrey

More sex abuse charges laid against B.C. man who went by ‘Doctor Ray Gaglardi’

Investigators now focussing efforts on alleged victims within the Glad Tidings Church community

Reader’s Lens

Reader’s photo of the week

B.C. VOTES 2020: Businesses now owe $6 billion in deferred tax payments

COVID-19 relief from remittance to province ends with September

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Abandoned Neucel mill in Port Alice to cost at least $17 million to decommission

Removing hazardous waste and de-risking the site ratchet up bill to taxpayers

Long-term care study credits fewer COVID deaths in B.C. than Ont. to funding, policy

The study was published Wednesday in the Canadian Medical Association Journal

Metis pilot Teara Fraser profiled in new DC Comics graphic novel of women heroes

The Canadian pilot’s entry is titled: ‘Teara Fraser: Helping Others Soar’

Most Read