Letters: Find a solution to tanker traffic

Solution should be found rather than rhetoric only

On November 12, Awareness Film Night screened the excellent film “Stand” in which the pristine wilderness of B.C.’s West Coast was shown. The film presented the argument that we need to prevent super tankers carrying diluted bitumen (dilbit) from traveling along the coast, as an oil spill would cause irreparable damage to the area and to the livelihoods and culture of the people living along the coast.

There was also a plebiscite on our municipal ballot to vote against more super tanker traffic along the B.C. coast.

It is easy to say ‘no, not in my backyard,’ but it does not solve the problem. Globally, there is a real, genuine need for oil over the next 50 years and more. The current glut of oil supply on the market is a very short-term phenomenon and in the medium and long-term as Middle East and other accessible reserves dwindle, oil from the tar sands will be more cost-effective and can be much more environmentally safe than alternatives such as drilling in the Arctic and Antarctic regions. In the short-term burning oil for energy is less environmentally damaging than coal and as alternative energy sources take over, oil will still be needed for making the many other products derived from it.

It is time to take a stand, and stop the raping of our natural resources for the further enrichment of a few shareholders and the benefit of foreign countries. It is obvious that the Northern Gateway pipeline built and operated by a private company, will not benefit anybody outside of the corporation and will be inherently a high risk to the environment.

It is time to develop and present alternatives that meet the demand for oil while minimizing environmental risk and benefiting the people of Canada and the rest of the world. One alternative would be to utilize a Crown corporation to refine the bitumen where it is produced, in accordance with strict environmental standards, thus eliminating the risk of transporting highly corrosive, toxic dilbit. Secondly, find an alternative route and port and have a Crown corporation build and operate a pipeline that will minimize the risk to the environment.

Isn’t it time to stand up and promote a solution rather than simply fight against the only bad alternative presented to us?

Don Brown

Sooke

 

Just Posted

Juan de Fuca curlers ‘reeling’ after learning rink will be replaced with dry floor

West Shore Parks & Recreation board says curling rinks not getting enough use

The rock is no more for Oak Bay ‘Sea Lore’

Council calls for change to controversial location proposed for art installation

Five highlights in the 2019 federal budget

Latest budget includes a sprinkling of money for voters across a wide spectrum

Facebook to overhaul ad targeting to prevent discrimination

The company is also paying about $5 million to cover plaintiffs’ legal fees and other costs

B.C. mosque part of open-house effort launched in wake of New Zealand shootings

The ‘Visit a Mosque’ campaign aims to combat Islamophobia

‘That’s a load of crap’: Dog poop conspiracy spreads in White Rock

Allegation picked up steam through a Facebook page run by a city councillor

Explosives unit brought in after suspicious boxes left at B.C. RCMP detachment

Nanaimo RCMP issues all clear after packages were found on lawn earlier in the day

2019 BUDGET: As deficit grows, feds spend on job retraining, home incentives

Stronger economy last year delivered unexpected revenue bump of an extra $27.8 billion over six years

Newfoundland man caught after posting photo of himself drinking and driving

The 19-year-old took a photo of himself holding a beer bottle and cigarette while at the wheel

Carfentanil found in 15% of overdose deaths in January: B.C. coroner

Carfentanil is 100 times more powerful than illicit fentanyl and used to tranquilize elephants

Disappearance of Merritt cowboy now deemed suspicious: police

Ben Tyner was reported missing when his riderless horse was discovered on a logging road

Most Read