Letters: Fletcher is mistaken about medicine

Sooke resident disagrees with Fletcher on "Hippie medicine"

Mr. Fletcher’s article on “Hippie medicine” was a real eye opener. It took the form of a typical conservative rant filled with the usual insults and once again lacking in true substance and objectivity.

He misrepresents the true value of vitamin supplements, medicinal teas and various detoxifying methods. They are not a relief for constipation but are invaluable in helping to rebuild a persons immune system. Five years or so ago I had two bouts of pneumonia in the space of a year and a half. Since that time I have rebuilt my immune system using “Hippie medicine” to the extent that I am effectively flu and cold free year round.Without this brand of medicine I’m quite sure I would be six feet in the ground by now.

Mr. Fletcher also seems to imply that gluten intolerance is just some kind of new designer disease. I too once leaned this way with my opinion until my granddaughter was diagnosed with this affliction as a young child. I thank the holy powers that be that the physician in charge had the courage to buck the tide of professional opinion and give us this diagnosis. It surely saved my granddaughter’s life and proved to me that this affliction is a reality.

I don’t know about Mr. Fletcher’s tastes but if I turn the tap on and it smells like chlorine I like to go to my cache of dechlorinated water for a drink. It isn’t a big deal to air out the chlorine, besides that stuff has to be hard on the guts. I also have to think that a person should be careful about the damage over immunization can do to the immune system.The documented truth makes it a definite reality. We all have friends who get flu shots every year but still seem to get colds and flu.

Modern conservative idealism seems to be bent on  thought and response control of public opinion. It’s not wrong or unusual to make important life changing decisions regarding personal health issues. Healing ourselves should be the main objective, free from narrow minded criticisms. Mr. Fletcher’s “Hippie medicine” has been evolving for centuries and is the backbone of any healing process.

Rodney Nyberg

Sooke

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