Letters: ‘Seriously misin-informed’

Letters to the Editor from within the Sooke community.

I hate to break it to the couple on last weeks front page story, but paying for treatment is common in almost every country in the world, Canada included.

The couple is seriously misinformed, as is anyone who believes that here in Canada, “they have to treat you no matter what.”

I am married to a European citizen, and even though she is here legally, as she has permanent residency status, she is denied medical coverage even though she is legally entitled to it.

If anything happens to her here in Canada during the two year process we have to pay just for a doctor to see her, and I assure you $2000 is a drop in the bucket. Just to be admitted into a hospital and see a doctor costs $800 for her and that is before any treatment.

There is no way around this. If my wife went into cardiac arrest and had to be taken to hospital in an ambulance and treated with two to three days care, our costs would be in the tens of thousands even though she is married to a Canadian resident, is here legally, and is supposed to be entitled to health care.

You want another fun fact? If my wife was pregnant and delivered her baby (a Canadian baby) here in B.C it would cost us $10.000 minimum, and that would be if there were no complications. Even though she is married to a Canadian and is here legally under Canadian immigration laws to have a baby here would cost us $10,000-$20,000.

I have traveled the world for over eleven years visiting over 70 countries and I assure you Canada has one of the worst medical care systems in the word in comparison to most.

Canada has a double pricing system in place for non-residents which is on par with some of the most corrupt developing countries in the World.

Other countries, including Mexico (where my wife and I have both lived), do not even have this.

My suggestion is that some people open their eyes and realise that much worse goes on at home. I also suggest a bit of research on what foreigners have to deal with when they themselves come to Canada and get into health problems.

Why should it be any different for us while visiting other countries? Why should we be entitled to something foreigners don’t even get here?

Justin Gilbertson

Shirley

 

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