Letters to the Editor: August 12, 2015

All of the letters which were send in the week of August 12

Proper protection

needed at crosswalks

I was almost hit in the crosswalk at Otter Point and Eustace Roads the other day.

A taxi stopped for me and a car coming from the other direction saw fit not to bother – another three metres and he would have hit me.

I would also like to remind people that we also have many ladies pushing baby strollers – with real live babies in them.

What is it going to take? Someone getting injured or killed? We need proper protection at all crosswalks.

Bill Jones

Sooke

 

Reach out and help

Grant Manor fire victims

Re: Grant Manor residents struggle in adversity to find new homes (News, July 29)

This wasn’t just one family tragedy that the community can rally around – it was more than a dozen tragedies. Each one of them, a fire victim, is a brother, sister, father, mother or grandparent to someone.

I’ve heard some people say in a dismissive way that they should have had insurance. Really? A lot of these folks have illnesses or disabilities. Some are low income trying to survive pay cheque to pay cheque. Does that make them less desirable and forgettable?

How their past lives unfolded is not my concern and knee-jerk pronouncements and pre-judgment attitudes do not address the plight of these poor, unfortunate folk.

How many times have you heard the saying: ‘they didn’t see it coming’? Yeah, they all lost big time. Yes, they will all rise up from the ashes, eventually, but wouldn’t it be a testament that the community reached out to each and every one of them in their hour of darkness and brought forth a shining light?

So, why not help these folks get their lives quickly back to normal, something that most of us take for granted. And then in self-exuberation these fire victims could each individually shout, “I didn’t see it coming.”

The Grant Road Fire Help Committee is trying to do that. Check out its Facebook page in the coming weeks for updates on fundraising and support activities. Just maybe, you might have something to offer them.

Mick Rhodes

Sooke

 

Water waste

is mind-boggling

A few years ago a typical neighborhood scene and evening time commitment was the use of sprinklers in yards.

With water restrictions, now a 4 a.m. walk brings out the sprinklers on timers on ornamental gardens and ironically the grass in front of District of Sooke offices.

A one-hour drive up Island shows bedrock where rivers once flowed and now warnings of moving to Level 4 drought conditions. Simply put: water for food prep and personal hygiene only.

Seeing Sooke water absorbed into streets  and flow down gutters at pre-dawn hours, brings out the reality of our up-Island neighbours very close  to home and made me feel  most of us don’t grasp the reality of the drought we are in unless we are directly impacted.

While hand watering is time intensive, do we need to get to the dire position of other communities who face such serious consequences to the drought while they must learn new ways of utilizing what we cannot live without and often take for granted – water?

Carmen Neumann

Sooke

Community leader will be missed

Ted Dever, a long time Sooke resident, passed away last week, just a week and a half past his 93rd birthday.  Ted was a good man, who dedicated his life to making his little corner of the world a better place than it was when he found it.

Ted was active in community development through supporting initiatives that would give youth a chance to thrive.

Wherever there was a chance to do somthing good for kids, you could be sure that Ted was close at hand doing what was needed to ensure it succeeded. Ted believed in giving youth every chance to fulfil their potential and his legacy will live on in those he directly or indirectly inspired. Sooke is better because he was here.

The world needs more people like Ted. He will be sorely missed.

Scott Hilderley

Sooke

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