Letters: U.S. is protecting our backs

US military actions on strait of Juan de Fuca aid Canadians

A problem with letters to editors is that facts are omitted to keep them short.

Rachel Lewis should answer many questions, such as when she lived in Port Angeles versus when the alleged “metal fusion” plant  began operating, how she can be so precise about the number of “black ops” helicopters that “buzzed” her in darkness, and what the concerns in Port Townsend are.  (Reference your November 26, 2014 issue.)

Checking the Internet I find Port Townsend’s concern is not the radar signals Lewis rails against, but sound from operation of  EA-18G aircraft replacing EA-6 aircraft on nearby Whidbey Island.

Some opponents confuse “electromagnetic radiation” such as from cellular phones and radars with nuclear radiation – fundamentally different risks. And about signal strength, which diminishes rapidly with distance. News media say the exercises involve aircraft finding trucks transmitting signals, and the only concern is people approaching the trucks hiding in forests (warning tape will be placed around them).

Of course there may be U.S. Navy aircraft passing along the Strait of Juan de Fuca, given their major bases on Whidbey Island. And the things she can’t see – missile-carrying submarines, moving to and from the well-known base at Bangor Washington.

Lewis should wake up to the reality that the U.S. military is improving training to protect her back, much more than the small though very good Canadian forces – who by the way sail their seriously armed ships past Sooke from the navy base in Esquimalt (some of them submarines), and fly anti-submarine warfare helicopters from Victoria International airport to and from the Canadian frigates that carry  them.

Oh, the potentials for paranoia.

Keith Sketchley

Saanich

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