Sign treaties, or ‘shut ’er down’

Finally, somebody in the B.C. treaty negotiation system has come out and said it. Ottawa needs to get serious.

B.C. Treaty Commission federal representative Jerry Lampert and chief commissioner Sophie Pierre say Ottawa's approach to treaties has to change.

B.C. Treaty Commission federal representative Jerry Lampert and chief commissioner Sophie Pierre say Ottawa's approach to treaties has to change.

VICTORIA – Finally, somebody in the B.C. treaty negotiation system has come out and said it.

Releasing the B.C. Treaty Commission’s 19th annual report last week, Chief Commissioner Sophie Pierre announced she has asked for a one-year extension to her term, to see the organization through its second decade. And if things don’t change, particularly in Ottawa, then “shut ’er down.”

The commission is the independent “keeper of the process,” and the chief commissioner is appointed by agreement between the federal and provincial governments and B.C.’s First Nations Summit. Its job is to facilitate talks and dole out funds to aboriginal groups researching and negotiating treaties. As of this year, they have disbursed $500 million, $400 million of it loans that must be repaid out of treaty settlements.

“We are 19 years into the process, and we have, just on the First Nations side, a half a billion dollar investment, and when are we going to start seeing a return on that investment?” Pierre asked.

It’s safe to assume that there has been at least that much spent by the federal and provincial governments as well. And after a burst of progress with the Tsawwassen and Maa-Nulth treaties, and a controversial deal with the Yale First Nation in the Fraser Canyon, costly inaction resumed.

Sliammon First Nation negotiators finalized a treaty in 2009. Off it went to Ottawa, where it has languished ever since, waiting for a set of initials that would allow a ratification vote by about 1,000 Sliammon people near Powell River. At stake is a settlement in which B.C. contributes 8,300 hectares of Crown land and Ottawa provides $37 million to compensate for a century of trespass and resource extraction from Sliammon territory.

(You can object to all this and try to live in the past, as B.C. Conservative leader John Cummins does, but we now have stacks of high court decisions that make aboriginal title real and inescapable, if not well defined.)

Other commissioners agreed with Pierre about Ottawa’s role, including the federal appointee, Jerry Lampert.

“The Canadian system is such that they are constantly going back to Ottawa for mandates for their individual negotiators,” Lampert said. “This is bureaucratic, and it plays against the idea that we’re in a real negotiation.”

With a majority government in Ottawa, and B.C. MP John Duncan as federal aboriginal affairs minister, there is hope of movement. And there is action on another front.

Federal Health Minister Leona Aglukkaq was in B.C. last week to sign an agreement to hand over authority and funding for on-reserve health programs to a new aboriginal authority that will work with the provincial health system directly to administer reserve health programs. This will end a parallel health system run by Ottawa on reserves.

A similar agreement was signed in 2006 for aboriginal schooling. Alas, five years later, there is still wrangling between the First Nations Education Steering Committee and Ottawa over funding. But I’m told there is progress there, with resolution possible by the end of this year.

Sto:lo Tribal Chief Doug Kelly, chair of the First Nations Health Council, says its financing terms are clear, and dealing Ottawa out of health care delivery will improve outcomes.

B.C. Health Minister Mike de Jong and Aboriginal Relations Minister Mary Polak agree that these broader self-government transfers for health and education, along with forest and mining deals, will bring treaties closer.

Pierre’s blunt warning must have been heard in Ottawa. It appears the Sliammon treaty has been located and will receive federal blessing this week.

Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Sooke resident Nathan Hanson popped both his driver’s side tires on a pothole near a construction site on Sooke Road. Hanson said he was following a line of traffic and was just before the 17 Mile Pub when he drove over the pothole. (Photo contributed/Nathan Hanson)
Driver blows two tires on pothole near construction site on Sooke Road

Ministry of Transportation says keeping highways in good condition a priority

On Feb. 27, a construction vehicle remained on the site of the former encampment between the Pat Bay Highway and McKenzie Avenue as part a clean-up effort. (Devon Bidal/News Staff)
Encampment between Pat Bay Highway, McKenzie Avenue cleared, all residents relocated

Efforts to disband encampment resumed after January fire

Environment Canada has issued a wind warning for Greater Victoria, with winds expected to get up to 70 km/h Friday morning. (Don Denton/Black Press Media)
Wind warning promises blustery Friday for Greater Victoria

Winds up to 70 km/h expected Friday morning

Passengers in rows 13 to 19 on Air Canada Jazz flight 8069 from Vancouver to Victoria Feb. 28 were exposed to a case of COVID-19. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette)
COVID-19 exposure found on flight from Vancouver to Victoria

Passengers in rows 13 to 19 on Air Canada Jazz flight 8069 Feb. 28 affected

Crews deal with a rock slide on the Malahat section of Highway 1 in 2017. (Black Press Media file photo)
Rock work closes Highway 1 in Langford for spurts

Friday closures could delay drivers up to 20 minutes

B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix and provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry head for the B.C. legislature press theatre to give a daily update on the COVID-19 pandemic, April 6, 2020. (B.C. government)
B.C. nears 300,000 COVID-19 vaccinations, essential workers next

564 new cases, four deaths, no new outbreaks Thursday

(Black Press Media file photo)
POLL: How’s your butter?

Recent reports have some Canadians giving a second look to one of… Continue reading

Anyone with information on any of these individuals is asked to call 1-800-222-TIPS (8477) or visit the website victoriacrimestoppers.ca for more information.
Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers wanted list for the week of March 2

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

Walter Gretzky father of hockey hall-of-famer Wayne Gretzky waves to fans as the Buffalo Sabres play against the Toronto Maple Leafs during third period NHL hockey action in Toronto on Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Walter Gretzky, father of the Great One, dies at 82

Canada’s hockey dad had battled Parkinson’s disease and other health issues

The intersection of Melrose Street and Third Avenue. (ELENA RARDON / ALBERNI VALLEY NEWS)
Suspect in custody after two pedestrians struck in Port Alberni hit and run

RCMP asking for video footage, credit witnesses for quick arrest

(National Emergency Management Agency)
No tsunami risk to B.C. from powerful New Zealand earthquake: officials

An 8.1 magnitude earthquake shook the north of New Zealand Thursday morning

Comox Valley RCMP had access to 20 Street blocked off between Cousins and Choquette avenues as they conducted a raid of a house on the block. Photo by Terry Farrell
Comox Valley RCMP raid Courtenay problem house, several arrests made

Comox Valley RCMP conducted a raid of a problem house on 20th… Continue reading

(AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)
Pandemic stress, isolation key factors as to why Canadians turned to cannabis, alcohol

Study found that isolation played key role in Canadians’ substance use

Grand Forks’ Gary Smith stands in front of his Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster float. Photo: Submitted
Grand Forks’ Flying Spaghetti Monster leader still boiling over driver’s licence photo

Gary Smith, head of the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster of B.C., said he has since spoken to lawyers

Most Read