A view of the Sooke harbour front.

AHOY BC launches marine tourism website

A new website on marine tourism in BC is about to launch.

Coastal communities in British Columbia are about to get a boost to their economies.

April 15 marks the launch of a website devoted to attracting marine tourists to BC coastal waters and its communities.

AHOY BC will lure visitors to British Columbia’s coast with vivid photos, suggested routes, inter-active trip planning and things to do in every coastal community.

Each coastal region will have its own section where visitors can select marinas and communities to visit, find services and learn what each community has to offer.  The AHOY BC brand aims to align with the Provincial tourism brand and its “Wild at Heart” brand essence.

Few places on earth can offer an experience of wild, living coastal waters with services and amenities never too far away. Until now, every travel region in the province had a marketing organization, except the sea.  AHOY BC markets the marine travel region.

According to David Mailloux, Chair of BC Ocean Boating Tourism Association, “The tourist in a boat has very different needs than the tourist in car. The launch of the AHOY BC website makes British Columbia a world leader. No other place recognizes the marine tourism market like we do, and no other place can offer our mix of amenities and wild nature.”

The marine tourism sector is a $200 million dollar a year industry. The need to market the Coast as a world-class boating destination has been recognized for many years.

Nearly $25 million has been spent on marina expansions on BC’s coast over the past six years.  AHOY BC adds value to this investment by, as Project Manager Michael McLaughlin put it, “putting more boats in berths.”

Destination British Columbia, the Crown Corporation responsible for destination marketing, supported the birth of AHOY BC through the planning and building stages. Additional funds came from Island Coastal Economic Trust, Coast Sustainability Trust and Northern Development Initiatives Trust.

The website includes guides on environmental stewardship, safe boating, fishing, BC Marine Parks, Aboriginal tourism and has lots of links to things to do. Look for the launch on April 15 at www.ahoybc.com.

 

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